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April 25, 2014

Daytime TV makes old people dumb

by Adam Finley, posted Mar 20th 2006 1:06PM
old ladyWell, maybe. Actually, a recent study showed older women who cite daytime dramas and talk shows as their favorite shows to watch did not score as well as those who listed other shows. However, Dr. Joshua Fogel of Brooklyn College of the City University of New York, the man who conducted the tests, was quick to point out this doesn't mean there's a direct link between stupid daytime shows and actually being stupid. Heck, if seeing stupid things on TV actually made you stupid this whole blog would be completely unreadable since we'd all be drooling and banging on our keyboards with our foreheads. Anyway, the research hasn't really proved anything, except their MIGHT be a connection between the shows we choose to watch and our own cognitive ability. Well, I know Grover's demonstration of "near" and "far" has helped me tremendously with my grasp of spatial relations, so maybe they're right.

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Canton

TV can be as pacifying or as challenging as you make it, Jon. Maybe these avid TV watchers here at TV Squad aren't "drooling and banging on [their] keyboards with [their] foreheads" because they actively think about TV before they watch it, after watch it and, presumably, while they watch it. Surely that's how they survive stuff like The Oscars?

And maybe the ol' ladies content to lose themselves in the daytime soaps wouldn't do so well watching more intelligent fare, such as Arrested Development or... The Office, even. Not shows to watch when your brain is tired. Or do they wake up your brain? That woudl be a good thing.

The circle of cognitive ability. Gotta love it.

March 21 2006 at 12:02 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Will

I think the study could be right on. TV is very pacifying. TV is not very challenging for your brain. TV should only be used when your brain is too tired for any real challenges.

March 20 2006 at 1:25 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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