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December 20, 2014

Angel: Bachelor Party

by Richard Keller, posted Jul 18th 2006 1:15PM

Glenn Quinn as Doyle(S01E07) Cordelia: I was thinking that maybe I haven't been entirely fair to you. Maybe you don't actually have zero potential.

Doyle: Wow, Cordelia. Thanks.

It was a shame that Allen Francis Doyle, played by the late Glenn Quinn, was only a temporary character on Angel. Viewers barely got to know the man before his departure in episode nine. Yet, his charming roughness was beginning to grow on us.

So, it was nice to see Doyle have a shot in the spotlight, just like Charisma Carpenter's character Cordelia Chase had in the episode 'Rm w/a Vu'. With the title of this weeks episode, and Doyle being involved, you would think that it would be an uproarious hour of comedic hijinks. Well, while there was a good bit of levity, 'Bachelor Party' was actually a pretty deep character study of our half man/half demon friend.

Since the series began we had seen Doyle as a rough-and-tumble kind of bloke who dealt with the seedier side of Los Angeles. However, as we heard from his wife Harry (Kristin Datillo) Doyle had a softer side, including stints as a third grade teacher and volunteer at a soup kitchen. Oh, by the way, I meant that Harry was still his wife; they hadn't gotten to signing any divorce papers yet.

But, she needed those divorce papers signed for, you see, she had found another man to marry. Doyle was shocked. Even though he knew there was no chance to get back together with Harry, and he was really pining away for Cordelia, he didn't want to sign the papers for that would mean that it was really over. It's here that we saw Doyle's rough hide be stripped away, revealing the man he was in the past.

He eventually does sign the papers, and gives the groom-to-be (Carlos Jacott) his blessing. Unbeknownst to him, the blessing also gives the groom and his family, who are all demons, permission to eat Doyle's brain. Of course, Doyle doesn't allow this, since he is currently using it right now. Luckily, Angel and ex-wife Harry come to his rescue. However, the marriage is off since Richard never told Harry about the brain eating. I mean, would you want to start a marriage with that much deception right from the start?

Even though Doyle was the main focal point it was a nice well-rounded show. Cordelia's opinion of Doyle turned right around after he saved her from a rampaging demon. Angel worked the investigative side of the new husband and was able to solve the case with minimal vamping. Glenn Quinn really opened up his Doyle character, showing him as a multi-layered individual who would rather not have spikes shoot out of his face everytime he sneezed. All together, a very satisfying episode.

Next week: Buffy's back, baby!

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Edgeoforever



"I killed Doyle, and I'd do it again,` laughs Minear."


Doyle meets his end in `Hero`, as the character sacrifices himself to save humans from a weapon launched by a group of Nazi-like demons. `I killed Doyle, and I'd do it again,` laughs Minear. `Truthfully, we killed Doyle because we thought it would be better for the show. It was something that was decided way before 'Bachelor Party'. All of those episodes that featured that character were there for this moment when he sacrifices himself. There were a lot of reasons, but I think mostly we were still figuring out the show early on; we were still figuring out what the dynamics should be. Again, you look at the pilot and the story where Angel doesn't save the girl. You look at episode nine of a 22-episode season, and the guy who is in the main titles, the sidekick, dies. The reason for that is that it proves anything can happen. It was decided early on that that would be an interesting, creative thing to do. And there was also some feeling, too, that David and Glenn's characters were very similar: They were both half human and half demon; they both had a past; they both were brooding type characters, and they were both searching for redemption. It just seemed like the same note to some degree. So we decided we could do two things. We could shake up the universe of the show; we could give our characters an emotionally resonating event that would help infuse the show a little bit. Again, for the first nine episodes, their shared history feels like it should be another series. This is a huge event in our universe that can inform things to come. I think you'll see that in later episodes. You look at THE EXORCIST episode, 'I've Got You Under My Skin', and if Doyle hadn't died, it wouldn't be as interesting.
http://www.timminear.net/archives/press/000040.html

August 08 2006 at 9:52 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Edgeoforever

Ladi, thse are Minear's comments on why Doyle had to go and when it was decided:

"I killed Doyle, and I'd do it again,` laughs Minear."


Doyle meets his end in `Hero`, as the character sacrifices himself to save humans from a weapon launched by a group of Nazi-like demons. `I killed Doyle, and I'd do it again,` laughs Minear. `Truthfully, we killed Doyle because we thought it would be better for the show. It was something that was decided way before 'Bachelor Party'. All of those episodes that featured that character were there for this moment when he sacrifices himself. There were a lot of reasons, but I think mostly we were still figuring out the show early on; we were still figuring out what the dynamics should be. Again, you look at the pilot and the story where Angel doesn't save the girl. You look at episode nine of a 22-episode season, and the guy who is in the main titles, the sidekick, dies. The reason for that is that it proves anything can happen. It was decided early on that that would be an interesting, creative thing to do. And there was also some feeling, too, that David and Glenn's characters were very similar: They were both half human and half demon; they both had a past; they both were brooding type characters, and they were both searching for redemption. It just seemed like the same note to some degree. So we decided we could do two things. We could shake up the universe of the show; we could give our characters an emotionally resonating event that would help infuse the show a little bit. Again, for the first nine episodes, their shared history feels like it should be another series. This is a huge event in our universe that can inform things to come. I think you'll see that in later episodes. You look at THE EXORCIST episode, 'I've Got You Under My Skin', and if Doyle hadn't died, it wouldn't be as interesting.
http://www.timminear.net/archives/press/000040.html

August 08 2006 at 9:50 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Gudlyf

Ladi -- According to Wikipedia: "The creator of the series, Joss Whedon has always maintained that his death had been planned from the start. However, rumors persisted that actor Glenn Quinn's out-of-control substance abuse problems interfered with production. In interviews before Quinn's death, creator Joss Whedon discussed plans for Doyle to return to the show as one of the season's big bad role. Quinn died before anything could come of the talks."

July 18 2006 at 10:24 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Ladi

Why did Glenn Quinn leave? Was it planned that way all along or was someone unhappy with his role in the show. I enjoyed "Angel" but when he died I couldn't believe it. The only other death on the show that really bothered me was Fred.

July 18 2006 at 8:38 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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