Powered by i.TV
November 25, 2014

Stupid internet ruins TV shows!

by Bob Sassone, posted Jun 11th 2009 3:27PM
Why do we, as viewers, like to be spoiled? It was never like this in the 60s or the 70s or the 80s or even most of the 90s. We never found out who shot JR before Dallas aired or what was going to happen on the next Seinfeld. THR.com sat down with the showrunners of several popular shows, including Matthew Weiner (Mad Men), Shonda Rhimes (Grey's Anatomy), Greg Daniels (The Office), Katie Jacobs (House), Alan Ball (True Blood), and Jenji Kohan (Weeds), and they talked about this and many other things. (Full interviews here.)

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum

9 Comments

Filter by:
coach of RMB24

Welcome to the coach coin purse outlet store. Here has many cheap coach purses.Coach outlets store, your
best choice! The purses here are just for you! The Coach Coin Purses make you graceful!

May 02 2011 at 4:15 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Age-K

I don't understand why people want to ruin the story by having things spoiled. I'll admit, I like seeing clips and interviews before hand, but I like to see stories unfold. You can always tell the way a plot unfolds when a movie/TV show sets up something as a surprise, but usually that surprise has been given away in the commercials beforehand or by someone who likes to blab it to everyone without any warning (how many Harry Potter movies were spoiled for me...gotten to the point that when I read the words "Harry Potter" I just stop reading)

I've said it before & I'll say it again, the one that gets me the most is commercials that say "This week, someone will die!" (or variations on that sentence) because you always have the people who watch every move made by the actors so they know who's leaving the show, or you can figure out who's going to die because of how things are going in the show. The TV death that got the most extreme reaction out of me was

BUFFY SPOILER

At the end of "I Was Made to Love You" Buffy came home and found Joyce dead. This was essentially a scene from the following episode, but by putting it at the end of a goofy episode about a robot girlfriend, there was no reason to even hint at it in the previews and then since we had already had the shock, they could advertise "The Body" all they wanted. Now, at the time, I had barely been introduced to the internet, so maybe people who were did know that she was leaving the show.

My sister was away at school during the final season of Angel and had no TV reception. When she came home, I showed her the whole season, which I had taped, and refused to let her see the "Next time on Angel" moments. Her reactions were great because she had no idea what was coming. It was like watching vicariously through her.

Alfred Hitchcock requested that his audiences not give away what happened in Psycho so that everyone could enjoy the twist. I don't think audiences today are that considerate.

June 12 2009 at 1:44 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Age-K's comment
Devin

I think you just hit the nail on the head, now people see it as more fun to ruin the surprise for everyone and let all the little twists and secrets out rather than letting people enjoy it when they see the show/movie/whatever

June 12 2009 at 3:06 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
GL

I don't really care about spoilers and it doesn't ruin the experience for me. The occasions when I avoided it, I have had no significant issue not getting spoiled.

June 11 2009 at 11:27 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Nacho

I've complained about this several times on this very website, only to be told that it's common for viewers these days to want to know about spoilers beforehand and that as a true fan, I should seek casting info beforehand so I'll know which characters die months in advance of when they leave the show.

It's basically becoming next to impossible to not know any major (or sometimes even minor) plot point before it happens these days. Even if you actively try to not be spoiled. I just wish that sites like tvsquad would do a little better about trying to shield their readers to things like that. This comment isn't meant towards any one writer in particular, but the website as a whole.

June 11 2009 at 9:37 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Nacho's comment
Niraj

"It's basically becoming next to impossible to not know any major (or sometimes even minor) plot point before it happens these days. Even if you actively try to not be spoiled."

If you're actively trying to avoid spoilers, you'd be avoiding TV news websites. So how would you end up getting any spoilers? 99% of spoilers don't get reported on regular news, whether you're talking TV or internet. I don't think it's that hard to avoid spoilers if you're serious about it.

June 12 2009 at 10:50 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Chester

Don't forget tv blogging web sites. I've known a few times "writers" have put spoilers on the very front of the intro forgetting that they could just wait until the reader clicks after reading "Spoiler Warning", sure glad TV Squad never does this....:cough:

June 11 2009 at 5:38 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Chester's comment
Bubbameister33

Oh Snap!

June 11 2009 at 6:20 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Tony DIMeo

I always enjoy seeing many great tv producers together and talking about tv, it's interesting

June 11 2009 at 4:15 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

Follow Us

From Our Partners