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November 23, 2014

The writer of The Usual Suspects is bringing Persons Unknown to NBC

by Jason Hughes, posted Jul 17th 2009 9:01AM
The Usual SuspectsNever before has so little information gotten me so excited about a TV show.

Here's all I know. It's written by Christopher McQuarrie, who penned The Usual Suspects. That's good. It's about a group of strangers who wake up in a deserted town with no idea how they got there. They're being monitored by security cameras and have to work together on solving a puzzle to escape. It's Lost meets The Prisoner. That's it.

NBC picked up Persons Unknown for a thirteen-episode run and we're promised that it will be heavily serialized. I'm sold. I love the idea of different people from different backgrounds having to work together, and I have complete faith in McQuarrie. The Usual Suspects is one of the most brilliantly penned films I've ever seen.

It's also nice to see the US finally embracing the short form series that the UK has been using for years. It makes for tighter stories and nice runs. Harper's Island was a good recent example of a satisfying story told in this format. I hope this means we can look forward to more "maxi-series" on American television.

Of course, it could be a thirteen-episode commitment to start, with a 90-episode back order from TBS if Tyler Perry gets involved. Who knows. If it does go longer, I can only hope that McQuarrie has a definite idea of what he's going to do so the story doesn't start floundering around like Heroes has done from time to time after that first great season. Sometimes the best thing a story can know is how and when to end.

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Mike

Sounds an awful like Unknown. The movie where Jim Caviezel and others wake up in a warehouse and have to figure out who they are, why they're there, and how to get out.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0450340/

July 17 2009 at 2:08 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
tony

I agree. This show sounds incredible! I fear though that the American viewing public who are fascinated by cookie cutter procedurals and karaokee contests won't get it, won't stay tuned or simply won't get it. Perhaps it will work better on cable than on network TV.

July 17 2009 at 12:27 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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