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April 24, 2014

Syfy Goes for Laughs With Comedy Series 'Outer Space Astronauts'

by Chris Jordan, posted Nov 12th 2009 12:00PM
David O'RussellIn outer space, there's no sound -- but that doesn't necessarily mean there's no laughter, either.

Syfy is set to debut a new animated comedy series called 'Outer Space Astronauts.' The series -- which combines live-action with 2D and 3D animation -- will debut on Dec. 8 and run for five episodes, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

"Syfy fans have never seen animation quite like this before," said Syfy executive Vice President of original content Mark Stern. "Out of the basement and mind of show creator, Russell Barrett, he's delivered a funny and fresh take on the future of underground and homegrown animation today."David O'RussellIn outer space, there's no sound -- but that doesn't necessarily mean there's no laughter, either.

Syfy is set to debut a new animated comedy series called 'Outer Space Astronauts.' The series -- which combines live-action with 2D and 3D animation -- will debut on Dec. 8 and run for five episodes, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

"Syfy fans have never seen animation quite like this before," said Syfy executive Vice President of original content Mark Stern. "Out of the basement and mind of show creator, Russell Barrett, he's delivered a funny and fresh take on the future of underground and homegrown animation today."

The spaced-out series follows the hijinks of eight military misfits aboard the O.S.S. Oklahoma.

An Oklahoma native, Barrett has a pretty slim resume to this point. His past work includes working as a visual effects supervisor on the set of 'I Heart Huckabees.' And speaking of: 'Huckabees' writer-director David O'Russell (pictured) will executive produce the series (we take it this means Barret survived his wrath).

The series is certainly not the first time space exploration has been used as a basis for a TV show. Here's a look back at our five favorite out-of-this-world sereis:

'Lost in Space' (1965-1968): A family, an evil scientist and their protective robot explore space.

'Star Trek' (1966-1969): Gene Roddenberry's original series about the travels of the Starship Enterprise is the beginning of a franchise and ground zero for geek culture.

'Dr. Who' (1963-1989 BBC): Technically doesn't explore space -- but it's still a time traveler. Again, the original series created a
franchise.

'Battlestar Galactica' (1978-1980, 2005 to present): Humans in the future search for a little place called Earth. Ever heard of it?

'Firefly' (2002-2003): Futuristic refugees from human a civil war try to make their war in the universe. Short-lived
series was popular enough to have a movie sequel, 'Serenity,' in 2005.

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