Powered by i.TV
April 16, 2014

Remembering Dixie Carter on 'Designing Women'

by David Hofstede, posted Apr 12th 2010 5:00PM
Not every situation comedy can get away with tackling serious issues, but 'Designing Women' was the exception. The series boldly confronted racism, homophobia and other hot-button topics while never forgetting that its first responsibility was to be funny.

Most of its overt political and social statements were written by series creator Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, and delivered by Dixie Carter as regal, feisty Julia Sugarbaker. For many fans, the most memorable and quotable moments from 'Designing Women' were those featuring Carter and her famous southern belle smackdowns, which earned the character the nickname 'the Terminator.'

To honor Carter, who passed away April 10 after a battle with cancer, we present three of her best 'Designing Women' moments.Not every situation comedy can get away with tackling serious issues, but 'Designing Women' was the exception. The series boldly confronted racism, homophobia and other hot-button topics while never forgetting that its first responsibility was to be funny.

Most of its overt political and social statements were written by series creator Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, and delivered by Dixie Carter as regal, feisty Julia Sugarbaker. For many fans, the most memorable and quotable moments from 'Designing Women' were those featuring Carter and her famous southern belle smackdowns, which earned the character the nickname 'the Terminator.'

To honor Carter, who passed away April 10 after a battle with cancer, we present three of her best 'Designing Women' moments.

1. 'Killing All the Right People' (October 5, 1987)
At a time when there was still a stigma attached to those suffering from AIDS, Linda Bloodworth-Thomason wrote this Emmy-nominated episode in which Julia dresses down a client who refuses to sympathize with its victims. "If God were giving out sexually-transmitted disease to people as punishment for sinning," Julia roared, "then you would be at the free clinic all the time!"

2. 'The Beauty Contest' (October 6, 1986)
It's fair to say that Julia Sugarbaker had a tempestuous relationship with her flighty ex-beauty queen sister, Suzanne (Delta Burke). But that doesn't mean she would tolerate anyone else attacking her sibling. When Suzanne is insulted by another pageant veteran, Julia gives her a classic sash-kicking known among fans as the "Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia" speech.

3. 'Reservations for Eight' (March 28, 1988)
This entire episode is one long, witty, remarkably-written battle of the sexes debate, pitting the Designing Women against their boyfriends and ex-spouses during a remote mountain cabin getaway. Linda Bloodworth-Thomason's script is so remarkable, it could still work as a one-act play more than 20 years after it was written.

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum

Follow Us

From Our Partners