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July 23, 2014

'South Park' Creators Respond to Censorship

by Scott Harris, posted Apr 23rd 2010 10:30AM
'South Park' creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker have responded to Comedy Central's decision to censor the latest episode of the subversive cartoon following threats from a militant Islamic group.

In a statement released on their South Park Studios Web site, Stone and Parker said, "In the 14 years we've been doing 'South Park' we have never done a show that we couldn't stand behind. We delivered our version of the show to Comedy Central and they made a determination to alter the episode. It wasn't some meta-joke on our part. Comedy Central added the bleeps. In fact, Kyle's customary final speech was about intimidation and fear. It didn't mention Muhammad at all but it got bleeped too. We'll be back next week with a whole new show about something completely different and we'll see what happens to it."'South Park' creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker have responded to Comedy Central's decision to censor the latest episode of the subversive cartoon following threats from a militant Islamic group.

In a statement released on their South Park Studios Web site, Stone and Parker said, "In the 14 years we've been doing 'South Park' we have never done a show that we couldn't stand behind. We delivered our version of the show to Comedy Central and they made a determination to alter the episode. It wasn't some meta-joke on our part. Comedy Central added the bleeps. In fact, Kyle's customary final speech was about intimidation and fear. It didn't mention Muhammad at all but it got bleeped too. We'll be back next week with a whole new show about something completely different and we'll see what happens to it."

The episode, which aired on Wednesday night, had come under fire from the New York-based group Revolution Muslim, which warned Stone and Parker that their decision to circumvent the Muslim prohibition against depicting the prophet Muhammed by putting the character in a bear costume could lead to their death. "We have to warn Matt and Trey that what they are doing is stupid and they will probably wind up like Theo Van Gogh for airing this show," their statement read in part. Van Gogh, a prominent Dutch director, who had spoken out against violence towards women in the Muslim community, was murdered in 2004 by an Islamic terrorist.

In response to these threats, Comedy Central altered the episode, bleeping out several lines of dialogue and covering some images with a box reading "Censored," and have also refused to give Stone and Parker permission to stream the original version of the episode on their Web site. These decisions, which have gained international attention, have come under fire from members of the media who believe that appeasement in the face of violence betrays the very principle of freedom of speech.

Comedy Central has yet to issue a statement on the matter.

In the meantime, you can see what fellow Comedy Central employee Jon Stewart had to say about the issue here:


The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon - Thurs 11p / 10c
South Park Death Threats
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show Full Episodes Political Humor Tea Party

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