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October 1, 2014

Short-Lived Shows

Short-Lived Shows: 'Central Park West'

by Bob Sassone, posted Apr 28th 2010 7:20PM
Central Park West
I'll admit it, I like soap operas. I don't watch a lot of them, unless you count 'Lost' as a soap opera. It has a continuing storyline over many years with many characters, it just happens to include time travel and monsters.

Wait...daytime soaps have had those too.... But I did watch 'Guiding Light' for 30 years and 'Knots Landing' for whatever number of years that show was on -- it was better than 'Dallas' -- and now I've found myself hooked on 'The Young & The Restless' because one day I was too lazy to reach for the remote control after my local noon news was over. That's how addiction happens sometimes.

There was another soap I liked too, back in the 1995. It was called 'Central Park West,' and considering the ratings the show got, I think I'm one of the very few people in the country who can say I watched it and liked it.

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Short-Lived Shows: UNSUB

by Bob Sassone, posted Aug 20th 2009 8:02PM
UnsubNow here's a show that was before its time.

UNSUB was a show that ran for a few months (eight episodes) on NBC in 1989. It was about an FBI forensics team that investigated murders and other serious crimes. Sound familiar? This was CSI and Criminal Minds before there was a CSI or a Criminal Minds.

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Jane After Dark: Firefly

by Jane Boursaw, posted May 24th 2009 7:10PM
FireflyI'm almost to the end of Firefly, my Jane After Dark readers' choice for this week. I really love this series, from the quirky characters to the general theme of a band of renegades burgling their way through the universe.

But even though it's set 500 years in the future, Firefly isn't your typical sci-fi space series that includes all manner of aliens and weird creatures. They're on a spaceship, and yet they rob trains. How cool is that?! It's like Alias Smith and Jones meets Babylon 5.

As with the other Whedon shows I've watched – Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel – the stories are fun and deep and fanciful (yes, I said fanciful), but it's the characters and their interactions that make the shows.

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Reprise the theme song, roll the credits, and for the love of God, revive Roundhouse! - VIDEO

by Eliot Glazer, posted Apr 15th 2009 6:07PM
roundhouse nickelodeon snick crystal lewisAs a kid, my parents were totally cool with my television viewing habits, as long as it never became excessive or kept my face from being kissed by the light of day every once in a while. Not that they had anything to be worried about, of course, considering that all I was watching was Nickelodeon.

While my fellow prepubescents were slowly but surely migrating to more grown-up programming on MTV (and Playboy, if you had a cable box), I spent the bulk of my time between 1992 and 1996 fully devoted to Roundhouse, a 30-minute sketch show sandwiched between the more popular Clarissa Explains It All and Are You Afraid Of The Dark? on SNICK, Nickelodeon's Saturday night programming block.

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Please restart Starting Over - VIDEO

by Eliot Glazer, posted Dec 22nd 2008 11:22AM
starting overRare is the episode of reality television that ends without a character seen having shed tears, made a vigilant declaration, or used pop psychological jargon lifted straight from the self-help section (see "I'm a very sexual person," "We share an energy," and "There's more to me than people might think").

For me, that phony vernacular of new age buzzwords that culminate in testimonials of poorly-worded self-expression are simultaneously the best and worst elements of a reality show. Naturally, that's what made Starting Over one of the few reality shows I could not only tolerate, but adore.

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Seven sketch comedies that deserved more chances than Mad TV got - VIDEOS

by Danny Gallagher, posted Dec 3rd 2008 10:34AM
Mad TV came along at a time in American television history when America had an excuse to get out of the house and live healthy and productive lives on Saturday night.

But eventually, the show evolved into a 60-minute scream fest of recurring characters spouting catchphrases over and over and celebrity satire that taught lessons about the proliferation of pop culture and ignorance. Important lessons, such as "Boy is Anna Nicole Smith dumb and fat!" and "Hey, is that Paris Hilton a whore or what?" Every episode felt like a hand was reaching out of the TV and rubbing a cheese grater across my face. Now 14 years after its inception, Fox has finally decided to pull the plug on Mad TV and let it die a slow horrible death instead of taking it out Old Yeller-style, the way God intended.

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Alex O'Loughlin inks deal with CBS...now if they could just create a show like Moonlight...

by Jane Boursaw, posted Aug 15th 2008 10:39AM
Alex O'Loughlin stays with CBSI can't decide if this is good news or bad news. Moonlight star Alex O'Loughlin is staying at CBS.

Unless you've been in another galaxy for the past year, you know that the Aussie actor cultivated an enormous fan base with his role as vampire P.I. Mick St. John on CBS' Moonlight. The uproar caused by the cancellation of the show in May can still be heard, well, in another galaxy.

At the Television Critics Association press tour in July, CBS entertainment president Nina Tassler said the popularity of Moonlight was due in large part to O'Loughlin's fan base. So I can appreciate the fact that CBS wants to keep him around. But it's what they'll do with him that has me worried.

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Short-Lived Shows: Throb - VIDEO

by Bob Sassone, posted Aug 12th 2008 2:04PM
Throb castI have a special place in my heart for syndicated comedies. I don't really know what it is, because a lot of them can be quite terrible, but I seem to like them more than the next person. Maybe it's the fact that I watched a lot of them as a kid and that has stuck with me. You don't really get syndicated comedies that much anymore, but here's one I remember fondly from the mid-80s.

It was called Throb, and it was about the goings-on at an indie record label. It focused mostly on a single mom, played by Diana Canova, who was cute and always good in everything she did. I can't remember one single plot from the show, other than the basic plot that ran throughout the whole show, Canova's attempt to juggle being a single mom and also running a business (and dealing with the cast of characters at the label, of course).

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Short-Lived Shows: The Lone Gunmen - VIDEO

by Brett Love, posted Jul 25th 2008 2:03PM

Tom Braidwood, Dean Haglund, and Bruce Harwood - The Lone Gunmen
"We tell the stories others refuse to tell." - Richard "Ringo" Langly

Like many of you, I have a growning collection of DVD sets from shows that left the airwaves too soon. If I had to pick just one to have back, it would probably be Firefly, but The Lone Gunmen would certainly be in the conversation. It was a great example of a spin-off done right. After years of service, fighting the good fight, lending a hand to Mulder, the boys finally got their own gig. Melvin Frohike, Richard Langly, and Johy Byers weren't your typical prime-time, leading man, characters, and The Lone Gunmen wasn't your typical prime-time show.

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Kevin McKidd Joining Grey's Anatomy?

by Jane Boursaw, posted Jul 4th 2008 12:23PM
Kevin McKidd on Grey's Anatomy?Like many people, I was miffed that Journeyman wasn't picked up for another season. But maybe we'll get our fix of Kevin McKidd at Seattle Grace next year.

Entertainment Weekly is reporting that the Scottish actor, who blew (some of) us away as the time-traveling journalist Dan Vasser on Journeyman, is in talks to join the cast of Grey's Anatomy. The rumor is that McKidd would play a doctor who scrubs in at the hospital after a stint in Iraq.

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Short-Lived Shows: Invasion - VIDEO

by Jane Boursaw, posted Jun 10th 2008 2:14PM
InvasionInvasion aired for one season from 2005-2006. Check out Jonathan Toomey's great reviewcaps here.

Along with Surface, Invasion was one of my favorite new shows that season, with each episode getting better and better. By the series finale, I was hooked. I'm still miffed that ABC didn't give it more time to flesh out the story and characters.

Incorporating a sci-fi-alien mystery, a government conspiracy, and plenty of family drama, Invasion had a built-in audience because it aired directly after another sci-fi mystery, Lost. Unfortunately, it wasn't enough to keep the series on the air.

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Short-Lived Shows: Married to the Kellys - VIDEOS

by Bob Sassone, posted May 14th 2008 1:05PM

Married to the KellysThis is one of my favorite comedies of the past ten years, and I no idea that it actually starred not one but two cast members from Lost. More on that after the jump.

Married to the Kellys was a sitcom that ran on Friday nights on ABC during the 2003-04 season, part of their TGIF comedy lineup. But I think this show stood out as something for adults more than kids. It starred Breckin Meyer as a New York City writer who publishes his first novel and decides to keep his promise to his wife and move (he thought she meant move from the Village to the Upper West Side, not "America"). Now, this is where the usual big city guy vs. Kansas jokes come into play, but that's just half of the show.

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Short-Lived Shows: Day By Day - VIDEO

by Bob Sassone, posted May 8th 2008 12:04PM

Day By DayThis must be Short-Lived Sitcom week. Yesterday I told you about Married People, and today it's Day By Day.

This was a short-lived show on NBC (ran for 33 episodes in 1988-89). It was about Brian and Kate Harper, a professional couple (Doug Sheehan from Knot's Landing played stockbroker Brian, and Linda Kelsey from Lou Grant played lawyer Kate) who decided to open an in-home day care center. Their teen son Ross was played by C.B. Barnes, who played Greg in the Brady Bunch movies and starred in the Starman TV series and Malcolm and Eddie.

But I'd like to talk to you about the two other females in the cast. Two that went on to much bigger things later in their careers.

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Short-Lived Shows: Married People - VIDEO

by Bob Sassone, posted May 7th 2008 3:02PM

Married PeopleMy roommates and I were obsessed with this show when it was on in 1990. We were all living in the same condo, all of them in college and me...not. We'd spend our time playing tennis, eating subs and Chinese, and watching Star Trek: TNG, MacGyver, reruns of Spenser: For Hire, and this show.

Married People was a short-lived sitcom on ABC. It was about the lives of several married couples who all lived in the same building in New York City. The star of the show was Jay Thomas, who was married to Bess Armstrong (they were the "middle" couple). The "older" couple (also the landlords in the building) was played by Ray Aranha and Barbara Montgomery, and the "younger" couple was played by Chris Young (from Max Headroom) and Megan Gallivan. Several episodes were directed by veteran director Asaad Kelada.

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Short-Lived Shows: Coronet Blue - VIDEO

by Bob Sassone, posted Apr 22nd 2008 9:42AM

Coronet Blue logo

This is a post about a TV show I've never even seen.

Coronet Blue was a short-lived TV show that ran on CBS in 1967. It was actually filmed in 1965 and CBS canceled it, deciding to burn off the episodes during the summer. The show actually did better than expected, but by that time the people involved in the show had moved on to other things. The show's star, Frank Converse, went on to N.Y.P.D. (hey, if you mix that show title with this one you get...NYPD Blue!).

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