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July 26, 2014

Noah Wyle Interview for 'The Librarian: Curse of the Judas Chalice'

by Kelly Woo, posted Dec 1st 2008 4:21PM
"I'm really having more fun doing these than just about anything else I've ever done."

In 'Curse of the Judas Chalice,' the third installment of his TNT movie franchise 'The Librarian,' Noah Wyle reprises the title role and battles vampires, searches for an ancient relic and romances a beautiful jazz club singer in romantic New Orleans.

It's Indiana Jones meets James Bond meets your college history professor.

Wyle chatted with AOL TV about filming in the Big Easy and returning to 'ER' for its last season ... and why he got reamed for talking about George Clooney.


Noah Wyle Q&A

    In 'Curse of the Judas Chalice,' the third installment of his TNT movie franchise 'The Librarian,' Noah Wyle reprises the title role and battles vampires, searches for an ancient relic and romances a beautiful jazz club singer in romantic New Orleans.

    It's Indiana Jones meets James Bond meets your college history professor.

    Wyle chatted with AOL TV about filming in the Big Easy and returning to 'ER' for its last season ... and why he got reamed for talking about George Clooney. -- By Kelly Woo





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    1. Why did you decide to shoot this movie in New Orleans?

    Well, our budget dictated that we had to scale back a certain percentage of the production values that we had in the other two, which meant we probably wouldn't be doing an international storyline. So we looked at America and thought, "OK, where's the history? Where's the mythology? What can we use?" And I think we all collectively wanted to do a good karmic turn by bringing some work down to New Orleans and employing their local craftsmen. And then once we'd identified that city, its own history and mythology sort of sprang to life and the story line followed suit.





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    2. Do you have a favorite New Orleans experience?

    It was all great. I mean, the great thing about these movies is I can be thrashing in a jungle in Mexico, or I can be riding a horse through the deserts of South Africa, or I could be poling a skiff through the swamps of New Orleans; I get to do it all. But I think just being there and [seeing] the indefatigable spirit that the people had and their ability to come on board this really fast moving train ... and infuse it with their sense of humor and their sense of professionalism, was really astonishing to me. The city still -- and will -- bear the scars and effects of Katrina for a long time to come. But [they] couldn't have rolled out a better red carpet for us or make us feel more welcome. Ironically, we went down there thinking, "Oh, we'll employ some people and we'll help the economy" and we got down there and found out we were the 11th production shooting [laughs], and that most of the crews had already been taken. We actually had to import crew members from Texas and Florida.





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    3. This movie franchise has done well for TNT. Has there been talk of making it a series?

    There's been a lot of talk about doing it as a series. That's something I'm less interested in doing, only because we stretch our dollars and our production values pretty thin as it is ... If we were going to try to make a series out of it, the storytelling would be there. But in terms of production costs and bang for your buck, I think it would be somewhat unsustainable, and I much prefer to see this franchise not diminish its own potential.





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    4. But would you like to return to series television someday?

    Oh, definitely; probably. How's that for an answer? Definitely, probably [laughs]. It will be at a time where I feel I can dedicate those kind of hours to something again without giving my family the short change. That's the only thing I'm reticent about. It's just a tremendous amount of hours and work to launch a series and to promote it. I mean, a cable show that does a shortened season may be more appealing, but for the time being I'm really happy picking and choosing work that affords me the quality of life with my family.





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    5. Why do you think the movies appeal so much to viewers?

    It probably speaks to a vacuum of this type of storytelling and entertainment on TV. You see it more often in features -- this sort of action-adventure-comedy geared toward famil[ies]. Being a father of two kids, there are very few things that you can sit down and watch all together and not feel like you're having your brain sucked out of you if you're an adult or like it's all going over your head if you're a kid. And this targets exactly that, and I think it delivers quite well.





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    6. Will you keep making these movies every year?

    I hope so. I think even two years apart is a little long to wait when you're trying to build momentum of viewership; 18 months sounds more right to me. And whether we continue to make them on TNT, or try and launch a feature off of it, or if we end up someplace else -- I couldn't tell you. But I really don't want to say goodbye to the character or the movies. I'm really having more fun doing these than just about anything else I've ever done.





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    7. You seem to really enjoy the comedic parts of the movie. Is comedy a genre you'd like to move toward?

    Well, it's one that I moved away from. I think during the early years on 'ER,' I definitely was utilized as more comic relief than as a dramatic touchstone. We had Eriq [La Salle] and George [Clooney] and Tony [Edwards] to play those storylines out, and I was the guy that was carrying the tray of piss and tripping in the background -- doing sort of more physical comedy -- and I've always enjoyed it. And then gradually as that character matured, and those other characters left, I sort of fell into the more dramatic storylines ... But I really love going to work every day and not having to think about cancer or dead babies or any of that other stuff [laughs].



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    8. How do you feel now that 'ER' is coming to an end?

    I'm really excited about going back, and I'm really excited about writing the final chapter to what this 15-year experience has been. I think the show's still firing on all pistons. But as long as it's on the air and I'm not on the show, it's sort of like watching somebody else raise your kids and you're accountable to it without having a contribution to it. The opinions that I've taken from cast members who have subsequently left are that we all feel similarly that the time is very right to have it go out with some grace, while still being a credible show.





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    9. What can you tell us about Dr. Carter's return?

    I really know very little. I know less than little. I think that the narrative will be a continuation of where the character went off -- to Africa and to practice more sort of triage international medicine -- and I think it will be having to do with his return to Chicago and to the hospital in some fashion. But beyond that, who I'll be working with and what I'll be doing is anybody's guess.





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