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August 30, 2014

DowntonAbbeySeason2

PBS Confirms Season Premiere Dates for 'Downton Abbey' and 'Sherlock'

by Catherine Lawson, posted Nov 17th 2011 8:50AM
Restive 'Downton Abbey' fans need fret no more: PBS has confirmed that Season 2 will (finally!) premiere in the US on Sunday January 8, 2012. The AP reports Paula Kerger, PBS president, as saying that the abrupt ending to Season 1 and the paucity of episodes -- there were only four -- led to angry phone calls from fans, many of whom worried that PBS might not even air a second season.

PBS also has good news for 'Sherlock' fans. The 21st-century twist on Conan-Doyle's deerstalker-wearing detective will start its second season on PBS on Sunday May 6, 2012. Alas, it's only three episodes long, but fans can be assured that it should be a case of quality triumphing over quantity.

Other gems from the PBS spring lineup include a two-part examination of Bill Clinton's presidency, a look at some celebrity family trees by Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, and a series on American infrastructure, 'America Revealed,' hosted by winner of 'Survivor: Cook Islands,' Yul Kwon. More on these after the jump.

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Good Show! 'Downton Abbey' Gets a Third Season

by Maureen Ryan, posted Nov 3rd 2011 12:15PM
Here in the U.S., we haven't even seen the second season of 'Downton Abbey' yet (it arrived in the U.K. weeks ago but doesn't air here until Jan. 8), but it's good to know that there will be a third season of the acclaimed period drama.

A U.K. newspaper announced the news today, as did Newsweek/Daily Beast writer Jace Lacob (update: PBS confirmed the third season via email as well). Julian Fellowes, who created the drama, will continue to write the saga of the aristocratic Crawley family and their servants, and the third season will follow the characters into the 1920s.

"I have grown very fond of my Downton family and I certainly do not want to say goodbye to them quite yet," Fellowes told the Mirror.

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'Downton Abbey' Criticized for Using Historically Incorrect Language

by Catherine Lawson, posted Oct 21st 2011 8:50AM
Who knew that PBS period drama 'Downton Abbey' could be so controversial? Viewers in the U.K. are halfway through Season 2 right now and there has been criticism that the storylines are moving along too fast. Now some viewers have complained that the use of anachronistic language is marring their enjoyment of the series.

Hot on the heels of a recent debate over a character saying "as if" (the horror), John Simpson, of the 'Oxford English Dictionary,' told 'The MailOnline' that some other expressions used, such as "get knotted," "logic pills" and "shafted" were not in use until much later than 'Downton Abbey's World War I time-frame.

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'Downton Abbey' Star Went on a Diet After Fans Called Him Fat on Twitter

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 5th 2011 8:30AM
Dan Stevens and Hugh BonnevilleMany actors say that they never read their press clippings for fear of seeing something negative or hurtful, but we just know that some of them go ahead and read them anyway.

Now one TV star has admitted that criticism from fans hit home, pushing him to go on a diet and lose 21 lbs.

Dan Stevens, who plays Matthew Crawley in PBS period drama 'Downton Abbey,' told 'The Daily Telegraph' that he hit the gym after he was mocked online.

"I think viewers will notice that I've lost [weight] since the first series," he said. "It's pretty much down to the fact that I had tons of comments on Twitter about how fat Matthew was looking."

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'Downton Abbey' Cast Talks Season 2: Love, War and More

by Maureen Ryan, posted Aug 1st 2011 11:30AM
Members of the media who attended Sunday's 'Downton Abbey' panel at the Television Critics Association press tour were treated to several minutes from the second season of the period drama, which takes place during World War 1.

The staples of the series were still there -- the gorgeous interiors and exteriors of the stately home gleamed, the starchy butler Carson disapproved of something being done by one of the aristocratic Crawley sisters, the snippy ladies' maid O'Brien looked down her nose at a cheeky new member of the below-stairs staff, and the relationship between Matthew Crawley, the man set to inherit Downton Abbey, and Lady Mary, an aristocrat with a scandal in her past, looked as complicated as ever.

But in interviews conducted before the panel, members of the 'Downton' cast said the war lent a new sense of urgency to the country house drama, which returns Jan. 8.

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