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April 16, 2014

Hurricane Katrina

'Treme' Actor Michael Showers Found Dead in Mississippi River

by Alex Moaba, posted Aug 25th 2011 10:20AM
'Treme' is a show that portrays the struggle and hardship that befell New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. Yesterday, a real-life tragedy struck 'Treme.'

Michael Showers, who played New Orleans homicide Captain John Guidry on the HBO drama, was found dead in the Mississippi River Wednesday morning. The actor was 45 years old.

A steamboat captain saw Showers' body floating in the river near New Orleans' French Quarter and called the authorities. The police told the New Orleans Times-Picayune his body had been in the water for nearly two days. No official cause of death has yet been determined.

The death is eerily reminiscent of on-screen suicide that occurred in Season 1 of the show, when John Goodman's character Creighton Bernette killed himself by jumping off a steamboat into the Mississippi.

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'Treme' Some Tough TV to Watch

by Stephanie Earp, posted Apr 27th 2010 10:31AM


I am one of those people you meet at parties who tries to convince you to rent 'The Wire', and may even offer to loan you my DVD sets if you seem interested. I might not know your name, but give me your address and I'll drop them by, possibly with some handwritten notes about my favourite moments.

You've met people like me, I'm sure. And right now, people like me are trying to figure out if the new show from the creator of 'The Wire' is going to be as important to us. In case you missed the hype, it's called 'Treme' (pronounced 'Tray-may') and it's set in New Orleans about three months after Hurricane Katrina.

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'Treme' Some Tough TV to Watch

by Stephanie Earp, posted Apr 27th 2010 10:31AM


I am one of those people you meet at parties who tries to convince you to rent 'The Wire', and may even offer to loan you my DVD sets if you seem interested. I might not know your name, but give me your address and I'll drop them by, possibly with some handwritten notes about my favourite moments.

You've met people like me, I'm sure. And right now, people like me are trying to figure out if the new show from the creator of 'The Wire' is going to be as important to us. In case you missed the hype, it's called 'Treme' (pronounced 'Tray-may') and it's set in New Orleans about three months after Hurricane Katrina.

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'Treme' - 'Right Place, Wrong Time' Recap

by Sandie Angulo Chen, posted Apr 26th 2010 10:02AM
(S01E03) 'Treme' delved deeper into the injustices big and small faced by each of the characters in this episode. I saw it twice and liked it much more the second viewing. It wasn't as gripping (or funny) as the previous episode, but there were several moments that beautifully captured each of the main character's chief post-Katrina struggles.

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'Treme' Gets Up Close and Personal

by Chris Jancelewicz, posted Apr 9th 2010 1:36PM


When dealing with serious and potentially flammable subject matter, especially something as cataclysmic as 2005's Hurricane Katrina, a TV show has to tread carefully. 'Treme', a 10-episode HBO miniseries focusing on post-Katrina New Orleans, does not tread at all. Instead, it dives deep under the floodwaters and resurfaces with the corpses of those dead and gone -- lest we forget the immense tragedy that unfolded there.

Where most shows would exploit the exploitable (the riots, the pillaging, images of dying or dead people, the Dome), 'Treme' takes a raw look at the aftermath through a series of vignettes. The viewer follows different families and individuals as they try to put the pieces back together. Sometimes those pieces are tangible, like the rotting structure of a flood-damaged home, and sometimes they're purely emotional, like the trauma caused by a relative missing for months.

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Here's the Trailer for David Simon's 'Treme'

by Bob Sassone, posted Mar 17th 2010 1:36PM
All some TV viewers have to see in this trailer for the new HBO drama 'Treme' are the words "From the creators of 'The Wire'." But even if you didn't watch that show you might be impressed by this cast: Khandi Alexander, Steve Zahn, John Goodman, Clarke Peters, Rob Brown, Kim Dickens, Wendell Pierce. It's about New Orleans and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and premieres April 11.

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CBS Sports Expects 100 Million Super Bowl Viewers

by John Scott Lewinski, posted Feb 1st 2010 8:30PM
Peyton Manning will lead the Indianapolis Colts into Superbowl 44.CBS expects Sunday's Super Bowl XLIV to be the most watched television program in history. And the network is looking to make a mint on the big game after managing to sell every available ad slot for the broadcast.

The problem is a couple of those ads were sold to odd buyers when you consider that this is supposed to be a massive entertainment event. People are supposed to have fun watching the game they've waited all season to see. It's a reach to ask them to think about heavy socio-political issues.

The network estimates more than 100 million viewers will tune in this weekend when Peyton Manning (right) and the Indianapolis Colts take on Drew Brees and the upset-minded New Orleans Saints. The Saints look to be the sentimental favorite as the city struggles to rebuild from Hurricane Katrina.

Meanwhile, the Colts are playing in their second Super Bowl in the last three years -- having beaten the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI.

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The Wire's David Simon takes on Post-Katrina New Orleans in Treme - TCA Report

by Joel Keller, posted Jan 15th 2010 1:29PM
David Simon, Wendell Pierce, and Eric Overmyer promoting Treme at the Winter 2010 TCAsIf there was anyone working in TV today who could create an accurate, in-depth portrait of post-Katrina New Orleans, it's David Simon. Many people call Simon's previous HBO series, The Wire, one of the greatest dramas of all time, and they do it for a reason: it has rich characterizations, well-examined stories, and it gives viewers a real feel for the underbelly of Baltimore.

So, with Treme, debuting on HBO in April, Simon tries to examine the lives of ten people who are trying to pull things together three months after Hurricane Katrina flooded out New Orleans.

"New Orleans, to me, represents a place where it's a triumph of American urban culture," said Simon. It's what - it's the best that an American city can be and also the worst in a lot of ways, as I said before, but it has created a culture that has gone around the world."

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Best TV of the '00s: News Events

by Brad Trechak, posted Jan 3rd 2010 2:03PM

9/11More of our best of the decade coverage, which started on Tuesday. You can read the other posts at the link above. We finish up the series by talking about some of the news events that defined the decade, and how TV covered them.

It seems odd to call the news events of the 00's a "best" list. As we started the 21st century, America seemed to have a different tragedy happening at every twist and turn. There was the Year 2000 bug followed by 9/11 followed by the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan followed by Hurricane Katrina followed by the worst recession since the Great Depression. We've also had various celebrity deaths recently including the iconic and controversial Michael Jackson.

The tragedies of the decade were accompanied by revolutionary change. America elected its first African-American President. New forms of media such as social networking arose like a phoenix from the ashes of the old media.

The decade was filled with many ups and downs, possibly more downs. The full repercussions of the events won't likely be acknowledged or analyzed for years or decades to come. Wherever we end up, it will have been one hell of a ride.

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Anderson Cooper is not emo!

by Bob Sassone, posted Sep 12th 2008 3:25PM
Anderson CooperNo, that doesn't say "Elmo," though I could understand the confusion because Anderson Cooper was on Sesame Street last year. I mean emo.

USA Weekend interviews Cooper and he talks about a lot of subjects, from the places he hasn't gone in the world that he'd like to visit (China), what's on his iPod (Marisa Monte), what he watches on TV (Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List?!), Hurricane Katrina, that he hasn't gone to the dentist in five years (I used to be like that too), and why his dog is almost human. When asked what he does on the weekends, Cooper says he works for 60 Minutes. Seems like even his vacations involve work too.

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TV Squad previews FOX's new shows

by Anna Johns, posted Jun 21st 2007 11:03AM
foxFox really only has a handful of new pilots to premiere next season because it's holding on to mega ratings-getters like American Idol, House, Prison Break, and 24... to name a few. It's replacing last season's stinkers such as Standoff and Justice.

At its upfronts presentation last month, the net announced two new reality shows, three new comedies and five new dramas. Of those, we have seen all the comedies and dramas except a drama called Nashville, which Fox has not yet released for preview.

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The Upfronts: FOX

by Anna Johns, posted May 17th 2007 2:02PM
fox logoThis year, FOX is hoping for a stronger fall season with a shorter baseball hiatus. Instead of 26 game nights, FOX is expecting to air only 14 games leading up to and including the World Series. Once again, FOX's January schedule has FOX poised for a win in ratings with non-stop 24 and renewal of American Idol. One schedule item worth noting is The Sarah Connor Chronicles, based on the Terminator movies. Fox chose to hold it until mid-season because they want a strong female audience, which is something they get when American Idol returns.

In: 'Til Death, House, Bones, The Simpsons, Family Guy, King of the Hill, American Dad, America's Most Wanted, Cops, Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader?, American Idol, 24, Prison Break,

New: K-Ville, New Amsterdam, The Sarah Connor Chronicles, Back to You, Return of Jezebel James, Rules for Starting Over, Kitchen Nightmares, Canterbury's Law, Nashville

Out: The Winner, Standoff, Drive, The War at Home, The O.C., Justice, Happy Hour, The Rich List, Vanished, The Wedding Bells, The Loop

Moving: 'Til Death, Bones (spring)

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Anderson Cooper gets a big raise

by Bob Sassone, posted Apr 11th 2007 6:01PM

Anderson CooperA while back I called Anderson Cooper "The Four Million Dollar Man." Looks like we're going to have to call him something else.

CNN has just given the anchor of Anderson Cooper 360 a big increase in pay. Cooper will be paid $50 million over the next five years. Yes, that's 5-0. That comes out to be $10 million a year, but it's up to you whether you want to call Coop "The 50 Million Dollar Man" or "The 10 Million Dollar Man."

So readers, is he worth it? It's really hard to judge whether one person is "worth" the amount of money they are given, whether it's Michael Jordan, Julia Roberts, or Anderson Cooper. But Cooper does indeed seem to be the future of CNN, the "face" of the network, if you will, and it looks like they want to lock him in for a long time to come.

Cooper hosts his nightly show at 10pm and also contributes to 60 Minutes over on CBS.

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Spike Lee wins journalism award for HBO doc

by Anna Johns, posted Feb 21st 2007 11:02AM
spike leeDirector Spike Lee has won a George Polk award for his documentary about the effects of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans. Called When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts, the doc chronicled the natural disaster and the disastrous way the federal government responded to the humanitarian crisis. The awards are considered among the highest honors in American journalism, along with the Peabody.

Lee's documentary was four hours long and initially premiered to a New Orleans crowd before airing on HBO last August. The program was filled with news photos and video footage, and all sorts of interviews from celebrities and regular folk who recount their experience in the aftermath of Katrina. Ultimately, the federal government and the Army Corps of Engineers are blamed for the sub-par levees and the response to the disaster.

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Fox greenlights post-Katrina cop drama

by Anna Johns, posted Jan 24th 2007 1:41PM
foxFox gave the green light to a pilot about cops living and working in post-Katrina New Orleans. It's one of four Katrina-related projects that were being pitched to networks for the next television season, but it's the only one that is moving forward. K-Ville is an hour-long drama that tells the stories of the police officers who stayed behind when the hurricane hit.

Other New Orleans-themed shows include two more cop shows based in the city that ABC passed on, and one called NoLa that NBC passed on even with the possibility that Spike Lee would direct the pilot. It's surprising, really, that K-Ville made the cut because the crisis in New Orleans continues. If nothing else, maybe it will renew the public's interest in that very damaged city.

[Via TV Tattle]

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