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November 23, 2014

MASH

Harry Morgan Remembered by 'Early' (VIDEO)

by Stephanie Opella, posted Dec 8th 2011 6:45PM
Harry Morgan, who played Colonel Sherman T. Potter on 'M*A*S*H,' died on Wednesday at the age of 96. 'Early' (weekdays, 7AM ET on CBS) remembered the actor with a look back at his career, which included another iconic TV role, detective Bill Gannon on 'Dragnet.'

"To be able to be on a hit show, 'Dragnet' and to come back and be on another hit show is something that not very many actors get to do in their careers," Matt Belloni of the 'Hollywood Reporter' observed in a discussion.

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Harry Morgan, 'M*A*S*H' Star, Dies at 96

by Crystal Bell, posted Dec 7th 2011 12:40PM
Harry Morgan DiesHarry Morgan, best known for playing Colonel Sherman T. Potter on the long-standing army dramedy 'M*A*S*H,' died at his home in Los Angeles on Wednesday morning, according to TheWrap. He was 96.

Morgan played Col. Potter for eight years, until 'M*A*S*H's' final episode on Feb. 28, 1983. The series finale was the most watched television episode in US television history at the time, with a record-breaking 125 million viewers.
A decorated TV actor, Morgan also appeared in other iconic roles, like Detective Bill Gannon on 'Dragnet.'

"Harry had a thousand stories. That of course comes from appearing in over 100 movies, and probably 10,000 television programs," M*A*S*H executive producer Ken Levine wrote, paying tribute to Morgan on his blog on Wednesday. "Harry was very much like Colonel Potter. He raised horses, and in fact, in the final episode when he says goodbye to Sophie, that really was one of Harry's horses. The picture on Potter's desk was of Harry's real wife, Eileen. And the only difference in personalities between Harry and Sherman is that Harry held his liquor better."

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Former CBS News Correspondent Robert Pierpoint Dies, Aged 86

by Catherine Lawson, posted Oct 24th 2011 6:25AM
Robert PierpointIt's been announced that Emmy-winning news correspondent Robert Pierpoint has died, aged 86. His daughter Marta Pierpoint told the Associated Press that he died Saturday, of complications arising from hip surgery at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital.

In a career spanning more than four decades Pierpoint covered six presidents, the Korean War, the Kennedy assassination, Watergate and the Iranian hostage crisis. He entered the CBS news room in 1949 as it was shifting from radio to TV under Ed Murrow, and he made his name covering the Korean War.

Pierpoint covered the Korean War from start to finish, and although he reported mostly on radio, his reports focusing on individual soldiers and civilians caught up in the conflict were featured in the landmark CBS 'See it Now' broadcasts including the premiere in November 1951 and 'Christmas in Korea' in December 1953.

His contribution was later honored in the 'M*A*S*H' series finale in 1983 when, in a case of art imitating life, it is Pierpoint's voice heard on the radio announcing the end of the Korean War.

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The 10 Best Classic TV Theme Songs

by Maggie Furlong, posted Oct 19th 2011 2:00PM
The Mary Tyler Moore ShowThe TV theme song is sort of a dying art: Some shows still have them -- and they're making a comeback of late -- but most choose a quick diddy and they're done. Having anything TV-related stuck in your head for days in this line of work is a very good sign of something special, so we prefer the shows that go all out.

Our pals over at AOL Radio are re-launching with a new and improved listening experience today, powered by Slacker, and one of the stations we're most looking forward to is TV Tunes. Obviously. They're playing theme songs from popular shows, past and present, 24 hours a day, now with 50% fewer commercial interruptions ... if only real TV was like that.

It got us thinking about our own favorite TV theme songs (including new ones like 'New Girl' on Fox. "Who's that girl? It's Jess!" ... and we adore her), which got us going a ways back in the old AOL TV archives for these gems: Our reader picks for the Best TV Theme Songs. Ever.

Take a look and tell us if you agree with this classic-filled top 10 ...

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TV Kisses Mashup: Watch Our Smooching Supercut (VIDEO)

by Avaryl Halley, posted Feb 10th 2011 3:00PM
Ross and Rachel's kiss on FriendsIt's Valentine's Day, so we thought it best to celebrate the occasion by getting everyone in the mood for love!

And what better way to do that than to watch a montage of some of the greatest kisses in television history? These kisses broke the "will they, or won't they?" tension between some of our favorite on-screen couples, challenged the censorship of the time, and quite simply, are just plain hot!

Warning: This montage may cause an uncontrollable urge to make out, so be sure to snuggle up and watch with your special someone (if you have one!) And if not, just close your eyes and fantasize about kissing Mulder yourself!

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Top 15 Christmas TV Episodes Ever

by Kim Potts, posted Dec 16th 2010 12:00PM
The Office
Our No. 1 choice for the best Christmas episode ever may not be a surprise -- any episode that involves the creation of a new, Christmas spin-off holiday has to rate a top spot! -- but countdown is designed to bring some ho-ho-ho holiday cheer to your celebration this season.

So, jump down off the aluminum pole, postpone that Airing of Grievances and recall these classic Christmas TV installments.

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Seven Satisfying Series Send-Offs

by Brad Trechak, posted May 27th 2010 9:24AM
The FugitiveWith the series finales of 'Lost' and '24' all wrapped up, it got me thinking about previous cult (but not necessarily popular) shows that actually wrapped things up nicely and left relatively few unanswered questions (unlike 'Lost,' whose encyclopedia-sized list of unanswered questions can be found here). The first person that complains about spoilers for these long-gone series will be whipped with a wet noodle.

1. 'The Fugitive' - This series finale set records for television viewing until it was revealed who shot J.R. in 1980. It also did something unprecedented in 1967; it actually resolved the running storyline of the show by having Richard Kimble catch the one-armed man, even going so far as to using callbacks to previous episodes. In the end, Richard Kimble and Phillip Gerard shook hands after Kimble was declared a free man, giving everyone the happy ending they wanted.

2. 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show' - A brilliant and poignant ending in which the entire staff of WJM-TV is fired except for the disliked Ted Baxter (played fantastically by Ted Knight). It ended with a group hug. Who doesn't love a group hug? More importantly, it had the sense of optimism for the future despite current hardships that was prevalent in Mary's character.

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'Miami Medical' - 'Pilot' Recap (Series Premiere)

by Allison Waldman, posted Apr 3rd 2010 2:08AM
miami_medical_2010_cbs
(S01E01)
Like CBS's other medical drama for this TV season, 'Three Rivers,' 'Miami Medical' is very earnest and filled with moments that strive for poignancy. The fact that it doesn't succeed is less a reflection on the network than the creators. At least CBS gets credit for realizing that 'Miami Medical' was less that the sum of its aspirations and planted it in the little viewed Friday, 10 PM time slot.

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Greatest TV Kisses: 10 Best Smooches in Television

by David Hofstede, posted Feb 10th 2010 1:00PM
Friends best kissA kiss is still a kiss, as the old song goes, but many of the most memorable TV kisses packed a much bigger punch than your standard smooch.

Some were unlikely, a few were unexpected, and a couple were delayed for years, boosting both sexual tension and viewer frustration. Just in time for Valentine's Day, here are 10 pop culture lip-locks for the ages.

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Alan Alda's Take on the Super Bowl Besting 'M*A*S*H' Record

by Allison Waldman, posted Feb 9th 2010 11:41AM
MASH_hawkeye_trapper_cbsYou gotta love the feisty attitude of former 'M*A*S*H' stars Alan Alda and Wayne Rogers about Sunday's Super Bowl broadcast being a record-breaker. Alda was gracious about the 'M*A*S*H' finale being topped by the Super Bowl broadcast. The New Orleans Saints victory over the Indianapolis Colts had more total viewers than the 1983 'M*A*S*H' finale. But Alda and Rogers both added a shot of vinegar to their honey coated responses.

Alda said in a statement to the L.A. Times, "If they broke our record, I'm happy for New Orleans and I hope it gives even more to cheer about to a city I love." However, he did wonder about how Nielsen measured the audience. It's a good question and one many people ask.

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What's the best TV theme of all-time, Happy Days or Gilligan's Island?

by Bob Sassone, posted Nov 12th 2009 3:04PM
Gilligan's Island/Happy Days
I know, I know, you're thinking, those are the only two choices I get, Happy Days and Gilligan's Island? Yes, according to this poll over at AOL Television. For the past several weeks they've pit various TV show theme songs against each other in a tournament, and the two finalists, for some reason, are Happy Days theme and the Gilligan's Island theme.

Now, it seems like these aren't the "best" theme songs, just the ones that readers and TV fans thought were the most iconic, or maybe it's the fact that they both have lyrics and that's what readers were looking for?

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Best War Series and Miniseries: TV's Greatest Depictions of Battlefield Drama

by Leonard Jacobs, posted Nov 11th 2009 11:00AM
Much as we may detest war, it remains a part of American life. And TV, from its earliest days, has been right on top of dramatizing it, satirizing it, explaining it, railing about it, even celebrating it -- or at least celebrating the brave men and women who proudly wear the uniform. To honor those who have served our country this Veterans Day, here are 13 of the greatest war-themed TV shows of all time. What are yours?

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Barry Levinson urges TV to take back Saturday night

by Allison Waldman, posted Oct 28th 2009 10:00AM
Barry_Levinson_PBSFor the longest time, I've kvetched about the fact that the television industry has stopped programming for Saturday night. For years, Saturday was a great night of television. I remember M*A*S*H and The Mary Tyler Moore Show, not to mention guilty pleasures like The Facts of Life and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. Even NBC's thrillogy, The Pretender and Profiler were fun. All those shows were Saturday night hits (some bigger than others).

Well, I'm not alone in missing Saturday TV; Oscar-winner Barry Levinson feels the same. Levinson is also a TV producer -- he did Homicide: Life on the Street and The Philanthropist -- and he thinks the networks are making a big mistake by not seizing on Saturday primetime. He knows the business pretty well and he's confused by the networks' strategy.

"I don't think the answer is to retreat," he told the New York Daily News. "When you give up Saturday night, you open the door for people to go somewhere else. Basically, they're shrinking their own audience."

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Patrick Swayze succumbs to pancreatic cancer at 57

by Danny Gallagher, posted Sep 15th 2009 2:04AM
Patrick SwayzeSome more sad news from Tinseltown. Movie star and recent television star Patrick Swayze has lost his 20 month battle with pancreatic cancer at his ranch in Los Angeles. He was 57 years old.

Barbara Walters will air the actor's final television interview in a one hour special titled Last Dance tonight at 10 PM eastern/9 PM central on ABC.

He's probably best known for his work on the big screen in movies like Ghost, Dirty Dancing and (of course) the timeless Road House, a movie that became a cult sensation for all the wrong reasons and helped birth the sense of humor of MST3K and Rifftrax's Michael J. Nelson. But like all Hollywood actors, he made his presence known on the small screen, and his reach goes much further than his recent venture into cable drama glory with A&E's The Beast.

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