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December 22, 2014

Mike Kelley

If you like Swingtown, you might like BiCoastal

by Bob Sassone, posted Sep 4th 2008 1:00PM
Showtime logoSo Mike Kelley, the creator of CBS' Swingtown, has a new show in the works called BiCoastal. From that title, can you guess what the show is about?

Exactly.

BiCoastal will air on Showtime, and is about a husband and father in Los Angeles who finds himself falling in love with a man who lives in New York City. Something tells me that the Parents Television Council is already making picket signs even as I type this. Or maybe they're just using the old ones, crossing out NYPD Blue and replacing it with BiCoastal.

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What's really real in Swingtown?

by Allison Waldman, posted Jul 5th 2008 2:02PM
Harry Reems partyHow much of Swingtown is real and how much is pure fiction? According to Mike Kelley, Swingtown's creator, there are elements in the show that come right from his childhood memories of growing up on the North Shore, a trendy suburb of Chicago. But the sex and the swinging? That's mostly creative license.

So were there really sex parties and swinging in the Kelley home? "You know, it comes from imagination, for the most part."

Inspired by 1976, the era of women's liberation, disco-dancing, the end of the Vietnam War, and sexual freedom thanks to the pill and no AIDS, Kelley balances the fantastic elements with nostalgia.

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Swingers and exorcist make CBS' wish list

by Anna Johns, posted Dec 20th 2006 9:22AM
cbs logoKeeping with its promise of shying away from procedurals, CBS has ordered pilots for two seemingly unusual series. The first is centered around an ex-priest who travels around performing exorcisms. It's called Demons. It's being created by Barbara Hall, who also created Joan of Arcadia, and executive produced by movie man Joe Roth.

The second series is called Swingtown and it sounds like it's bound for a 10 pm time slot. The series is set in the 1970s and is about a bunch of married couples who swap spouses. It's being created by Mike Kelley, writer and executive producer of The O.C.

Pilot season, by the way, is soon upon us. January is traditionally the time of year when the networks request pilots from all the television veterans and wanna-bes who have been pitching them this fall.

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