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July 23, 2014

MorkAndMindy

When Good Shows Go Bad (AKA the 'Heroes' Hall of Shame)

by Gary Susman, posted Nov 20th 2009 5:00PM
Recently, we were inspired by 'Parks and Recreation' to write a feature listing TV shows that overcame a rocky launch. Sadly, the reverse seems more common: shows that start strong but finish weak.

Our latest inspiration is the ongoing death spiral of 'Heroes.' (This week: Mohinder does something stupid! People's powers go awry at inopportune moments! Adrian Pasdar, pictured, looks like he'd rather be anywhere else!) Here's a once-inspired show that seems to be going down in flames after having run out of ideas.

Other times, shows peter out because of casting changes, bad writing or bizarre creative decisions. In each case, however, the audience feels betrayed and often deserts the show, leading to ratings death and what-went-wrong autopsies. Here's what went wrong on nine other good shows gone bad.

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What to Watch Friday, Nov. 28

by Kim Potts, posted Nov 28th 2008 5:00AM
monk'Monk' and 'Psych'
(9PM & 10PM, USA) holiday specials
Anyone wondering what to put in Monk's Christmas stocking this year can start with an extra-large bottle of antibacterial gel; the germaphobe is going to need it when he agrees to help three homeless guys (particularly unkempt homeless guys) investigate the death of their friend.

Meanwhile, 'Psych' pals Shawn and Gus have their own holiday case, as a little girl begs them for help in getting a mall Santa out of jail.

Of course, there's more to the story where Santa and his little helper are concerned, and they're not the only ones with a secret: Shawn is trying to keep Gus from finding out that Shawn and Joy, Gus' sister, got busy under the mistletoe.


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Frak and other fictional curse words

by Brad Trechak, posted Sep 2nd 2008 7:02PM
Battlestar GalacticaThere is a marvelous article on CNN about the origins of the word "Frak", the replacement curse word used heavily in the series Battlestar Galactica. It seems that the word was invented in the original 70's version of the show by creator Glen A. Larson but it was seldom used.

It got me thinking about other replacement profanities used by scripted television to replace the normal curse words that the FCC bans from televised broadcasts. We have previously posted about made-up words on television (including the profanities "Smeg" from Red Dwarf and "Frell" from Farscape), but I have a few to add to that list:

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Ten great fashion statements on TV

by Paul Goebel, posted May 14th 2008 11:04AM

Catherine BachTelevision has often been a benchmark of current popular culture. Whether it's clothes, cars or furniture, people have always looked to TV to help them decide how to look and how to live. Here are ten great examples of how TV characters have "helped" us look our best.

Daisy Duke's Daisy Dukes (The Dukes of Hazzard)
No one knew it at the time, but when Catherine Bach slipped on those ultra-short denims, she was making an impression on more than the teenage boys who were watching. Years later, a brand new and very different generation embraced the Daisy Dukes, much to the delight of those teenage boys who were now old enough to know better.

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Robin Williams to guest on SVU

by Allison Waldman, posted Mar 18th 2008 8:43PM
Robin WilliamsIt feels like a sweeps moment -- a big name star guesting on a long-running show. But it's not set for sweeps. It is, however, a special occasion and a reason to do something festive. So, on April 29, Robin Williams will make a guest appearance on Law & Order: SVU in part to celebrate the 200th episode of the intense NBC crime drama.

The Oscar-winning actor (for Good Will Hunting) is no stranger to television, as we all know. Till the day he dies, he'll be Mork. Na-noo, na-noo. As an alien from the planet Ork, Robin Williams was catapulted from obscure comic actor to overnight sensation thanks to the Garry Marshall sitcom Mork & Mindy. It was the beginning of a stellar career.

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TV Catchphrases Quiz

by AOL TV Staff, posted Dec 5th 2007 11:26AM
On which show did the phrase "Yada, yada, yada" first appear?

'The Office''s Michael Scott (Steve Carell) single-handedly brought back "That's what she said" jokes and the world is forever in his debt.

Some shows are so jam-packed with quotable lines that it's hard to keep track of who said what.

It's time to prove your knowledge of the origins of television's greatest catchphrases by taking our quiz.



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TV Obits: Molin, Weber, Mazzone

by Bob Sassone, posted May 25th 2007 8:02AM

Molin, Arnaz, CahnA roundup of TV people from in front of the camera and behind the scenes who have passed away.

  • Bud Molin: He was a film editor who worked on several TV shows, including the Sheldon Leonard-produced The Dick Van Dyke Show, The Andy Griffith Show, and I Spy, as well as projects with Carl Reiner, including the movies The Jerk, Oh, God, The Man With Two Brains, and Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid. He also worked on I Love Lucy. Molin died in Rancho Mirage, CA at age 81. (That's him on the left, with Desi Arnaz and Dann Cahn.)

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Robert Donner dead at 75

by Bob Sassone, posted Jun 15th 2006 6:32PM
Robert DonnerThough he appeared in many memorable films, including Rio Bravo, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence, Chisum, and Cool Hand Luke, character actor Robert Donner will probably be most remembered from his role as Exidor on Robin Williams late 70s/early 80s sitcom Mork and Mindy.

Donner appeared in, well, just about every TV show of the past 30 years, including The Waltons, MacGyver, Simon and Simon, Blue Thunder, Fame, Matlock, Charlie's Angels, SWAT, Gunsmoke, Adam-12, Columbo, and Kung Fu. His last role was in this year's family movie Hoot.

Donner died of a heart attack on in L.A. on June 8.

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