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September 2, 2014

NewOrleans

Anthony Bourdain Kills the Pig for a New Orleans Feast on 'No Reservations' (VIDEO)

by Nick Zaino, posted Aug 30th 2011 6:45PM
Anthony Bourdain waits to give the pig the good news on 'No Reservations'Anthony Bourdain is usually good at uncovering the details most other people might miss, and he didn't shirk that duty in his New Orleans episode of 'No Reservations' (Mondays, 9PM on Travel Channel). He showed the politics of the city with the help of 'Treme' writer Lolis Elie, the community effort that goes into a public feast, and even took part in killing the pig for pork.

'Treme' is often a political show, by necessity, and you can see where that voice comes from listening to Elie. "How can our chefs and our musicians be less vital to the national interest than whatever's going on in Iraq and Afghanistan or halfway around the world," he said. When it came time, Bourdain did not flinch from dispatching the pig with a pistol. "That's the way they taught me in Jersey," he said.

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Jealous Brides and Crazy Weddings on Premiere of 'Big Easy Brides' (VIDEO)

by Jason Hughes, posted Aug 22nd 2011 5:15AM
'Big Easy Brides' premiereNew Orleans' French Quarter Wedding Chapel is at the heart of the new series 'Big Easy Brides' (Sun., 10PM ET on WE). That show title, however, could certainly bring another very different image to mind, and not a very flattering one. Still, it does grab your attention, even if not for the right reasons, and any attention is good for a fledgling show.

The series follows the staff at the chapel as they preside over weddings from the mundane to the outrageous. Superheroes, voodoo, lingerie ... nothing is too much for them to handle. And they'll do what they can to make it as special as it can be.

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'Treme' - 'Right Place, Wrong Time' Recap

by Sandie Angulo Chen, posted Apr 26th 2010 10:02AM
(S01E03) 'Treme' delved deeper into the injustices big and small faced by each of the characters in this episode. I saw it twice and liked it much more the second viewing. It wasn't as gripping (or funny) as the previous episode, but there were several moments that beautifully captured each of the main character's chief post-Katrina struggles.

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'Treme' - 'Meet De Boys on the Battlefront' Recap

by Sandie Angulo Chen, posted Apr 19th 2010 1:10AM
(S01E02) The second episode of 'Treme' may not appease the commenters who complained last week about the show's lack of action, but for those who appreciate the series' atmosphere, music, and admittedly slow (but detailed) character development, this was a big step forward.

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When the Shows Go Marching In: A History of TV Shows Set in New Orleans

by Danny Gallagher, posted Apr 13th 2010 11:04AM
The skyline of New Orleans from Uptown
Very few shows have featured New Orleans as its setting, and it's not hard to see why. The list is a mix of critically acclaimed but quickly canceled shows, and critically disemboweled and canceled-just-as-quickly shows.

'Treme,' HBO's new drama from 'The Wire' creator David Simon and 'Wire' writer/producer Eric Overmyer, could break the mold that so many others have tried to crack. Judging from the first episode, their chances are looking good. If 'Treme' goes on to achieve the fame that 'The Wire' has, it won't just have its staff, creators, or even the city to thank for providing such beautiful inspiration.

It will have these other shows to thank for choking on that overcooked beignet for them.

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An Interview Turns Heated on 'Treme' (VIDEO)

by Jane Boursaw, posted Apr 12th 2010 4:40AM
Treme, John GoodmanAn interview turns heated on 'Treme' (Sun., 10PM ET on HBO), the new HBO show from Eric Overmyer and David Simon. Who says New Orleans isn't a great city? Don't tell Creighton Bernette that!

And isn't it awesome to see John Goodman back in a series? We've missed you, John!

Watch the video after the jump.

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'Treme' Gets Up Close and Personal

by Chris Jancelewicz, posted Apr 9th 2010 1:36PM


When dealing with serious and potentially flammable subject matter, especially something as cataclysmic as 2005's Hurricane Katrina, a TV show has to tread carefully. 'Treme', a 10-episode HBO miniseries focusing on post-Katrina New Orleans, does not tread at all. Instead, it dives deep under the floodwaters and resurfaces with the corpses of those dead and gone -- lest we forget the immense tragedy that unfolded there.

Where most shows would exploit the exploitable (the riots, the pillaging, images of dying or dead people, the Dome), 'Treme' takes a raw look at the aftermath through a series of vignettes. The viewer follows different families and individuals as they try to put the pieces back together. Sometimes those pieces are tangible, like the rotting structure of a flood-damaged home, and sometimes they're purely emotional, like the trauma caused by a relative missing for months.

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'Treme' Reviews

by Allyssa Lee, posted Apr 8th 2010 8:00PM
Set three months after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, HBO's new series 'Treme' follows, quite simply, a loosely-connected network of New Orleans residents as they struggle to pick up their lives in the wake of the disaster.

But given that this is the latest effort from David Simon -- the much-heralded creator of the seminal HBO series 'The Wire' -- this drama proves to be so much more than just that.

Those expecting a Big Easy version of 'The Wire,' however, are out of luck. This is no police drama, and the city's politics are largely unexplored. The series takes its title from Faubourg Tremé, the historic New Orleans neighborhood adjacent to the French Quarter thought to be the birthplace of jazz. And the music from this multi-cultural, multi-storied, proud yet battered city pulses like a heartbeat throughout.

There's been no shortage of talent gracing this drama. The ensemble cast includes 'Wire' vets Wendell Pierce (a New Orleans native) and Clarke Peters, Khandi Alexander, Kim Dickens, Melissa Leo, John Goodman and Steve Zahn, in his first regular TV series role. Guest appearances from musicians such as Allen Toussaint, Elvis Costello, Dr. John and Kermit Ruffins lend authenticity.

Nor has there been a shortage of media coverage leading up to 'Treme's April 11 premiere. Sadly, part of that has been due to the unexpected death of one of the team's writers, David Mills. But 'Treme' is also being hailed as more than just another television program: It's an event. While some have noted the series' meandering pace, many critics have been praising Simon and co-creator Eric Overmyer's new series for its ability to immediately transport viewers on a musical journey into the heartbeat and the heartbreak of this weird and wonderful city.

Read what the critics had to say after the jump.

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Behind-the-Scenes of HBO's 'Treme' (New Video!)

by Chris Harnick, posted Mar 29th 2010 2:20PM
TremeWith a strong cast of actors, award-winning veteran creators and a setting that has been a hotbed of controversy, heartache and celebration for years, HBO's 'Treme' (premiering Sun., April 11, 10PM ET) has been set up to be a hit for the cable network

Set three months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the series will focus on how the neighborhood of Treme is rebuilding. The series comes from David Simon, creator of HBO's 'The Wire' and his collaborator on 'The Wire' and 'Homicide: Life on the Street,' Eric Overmyer.

'Treme' stars quite a few familiar faces such as Steve Zahn in his first series regular role, Khandi Alexander, John Goodman and Wendell Pierce.

Check out the video after the jump.

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CBS Sports Expects 100 Million Super Bowl Viewers

by John Scott Lewinski, posted Feb 1st 2010 8:30PM
Peyton Manning will lead the Indianapolis Colts into Superbowl 44.CBS expects Sunday's Super Bowl XLIV to be the most watched television program in history. And the network is looking to make a mint on the big game after managing to sell every available ad slot for the broadcast.

The problem is a couple of those ads were sold to odd buyers when you consider that this is supposed to be a massive entertainment event. People are supposed to have fun watching the game they've waited all season to see. It's a reach to ask them to think about heavy socio-political issues.

The network estimates more than 100 million viewers will tune in this weekend when Peyton Manning (right) and the Indianapolis Colts take on Drew Brees and the upset-minded New Orleans Saints. The Saints look to be the sentimental favorite as the city struggles to rebuild from Hurricane Katrina.

Meanwhile, the Colts are playing in their second Super Bowl in the last three years -- having beaten the Chicago Bears in Super Bowl XLI.

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The Wire's David Simon takes on Post-Katrina New Orleans in Treme - TCA Report

by Joel Keller, posted Jan 15th 2010 1:29PM
David Simon, Wendell Pierce, and Eric Overmyer promoting Treme at the Winter 2010 TCAsIf there was anyone working in TV today who could create an accurate, in-depth portrait of post-Katrina New Orleans, it's David Simon. Many people call Simon's previous HBO series, The Wire, one of the greatest dramas of all time, and they do it for a reason: it has rich characterizations, well-examined stories, and it gives viewers a real feel for the underbelly of Baltimore.

So, with Treme, debuting on HBO in April, Simon tries to examine the lives of ten people who are trying to pull things together three months after Hurricane Katrina flooded out New Orleans.

"New Orleans, to me, represents a place where it's a triumph of American urban culture," said Simon. It's what - it's the best that an American city can be and also the worst in a lot of ways, as I said before, but it has created a culture that has gone around the world."

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David Simon's Treme gets a teaser trailer and a premiere date

by Mike Moody, posted Jan 11th 2010 2:01PM
treme logo hbo
David Simon, creator of The Wire, is shifting his lens from the mean streets of Baltimore to post-Katrina New Orleans with Treme. The HBO series is set in a Crescent City neighborhood rich in Créole and African American history. Unlike The Wire, Treme will tighten its scope to focus on the musicians and working class people living among the city's ongoing reconstruction efforts.

The Wire was a dense and sprawling tale, unearthing corruption and secrets everywhere from grimy back alleys to city hall. Treme's reportedly smaller scope recalls Simon's first series, Homicide: Life on the Street. The pioneering NBC drama centered on the tough and streetwise detectives sweating away at a Baltimore police precinct. Simply put, the show was a masterpiece that offered a rich, compelling and sometimes avant-garde micro-study of overworked cops.

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HBO picks up The Wire creator's new New Orleans show

by Danny Gallagher, posted May 6th 2009 10:03AM
The Wire and Treme creator David SimonHBO has picked up four new shows, one of which could be the smartest and most compelling thing in the history of the universe, as long as the hype doesn't kill it.

David Simon, the creator of The Wire, has received a nine-episode greenlight for his new show Treme, a character drama that looks at the lives of New Orleans musicians in the post-Katrina reconstruction.

Simon brought the show to life with Eric Overmeyer, both of whom worked together on Homicide: Life on the Street. It will also star former Wire stars Wendell Pierce and Clarke Peters as well as Steve Zahn, Khandi Alexander, Melissa Leo, Kim Dickens and Rob Brown.

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Top Chef serves up a new winner

by Allison Waldman, posted Feb 26th 2009 3:02PM
The fifth edition of Top Chef came to a conclusion last night. I'd like to say it was one of the all-time best seasons, that I was on the edge of my seat with excitement, that I was really rooting for one competitor more than another... I'd like to say that, but I can't. All in all, Top Chef New York, which became Top Chef New Orleans in the last few episodes, was kind of a dud.

Before I talk about the winner and what happened specifically in the finale, I have to ask why Top Chef failed to really make use of the location this time around? New York is all about food and great restaurants and amazing chefs, but I can't think of one episode that really used the city in a creative way. Where was the Little Italy challenge? What about a trip to Chinatown for wild ingredients? Gail Simmons' bridal shower could have taken place anywhere. The Super Bowl challenge was generic. And when it was time for the finale, TC went to the Big Easy. Is that any way to honor the Big Apple?

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Spike Lee wins journalism award for HBO doc

by Anna Johns, posted Feb 21st 2007 11:02AM
spike leeDirector Spike Lee has won a George Polk award for his documentary about the effects of Hurricane Katrina on New Orleans. Called When the Levees Broke: A Requiem in Four Acts, the doc chronicled the natural disaster and the disastrous way the federal government responded to the humanitarian crisis. The awards are considered among the highest honors in American journalism, along with the Peabody.

Lee's documentary was four hours long and initially premiered to a New Orleans crowd before airing on HBO last August. The program was filled with news photos and video footage, and all sorts of interviews from celebrities and regular folk who recount their experience in the aftermath of Katrina. Ultimately, the federal government and the Army Corps of Engineers are blamed for the sub-par levees and the response to the disaster.

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