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April 23, 2014

TheDickVanDykeShow

'The Dick Van Dyke Show' Turns 50 Today

by Catherine Lawson, posted Oct 3rd 2011 9:30AM
'The Dick Van Dyke Show'Before he was known as an all-singing, all-dancing chimney sweep or a crime-fighting doctor, Dick Van Dyke was famous for playing comedy writer Rob Petrie on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show.'

The landmark comedy debuted on CBS on Oct. 3 1961, exactly 50 years ago today, and it's been announced that having acquired the broadcast rights, TV Land will mark the anniversary by airing all 159 episodes of the series, premiering tonight.

Deadline reports that the network will run episodes in a three-hour block from 6-9PM ET Monday through Friday, culminating in a marathon over the weekend.

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Review: Two and a Half Men - Warning. It's Dirty.

by Allison Waldman, posted Dec 15th 2009 6:55AM
CBS_two_and_a_half_men_christmas
(S07E11)
The holidays are a time for family and reflection and cheer. Unless you're the Harper family and gathering in Malibu becomes a test to see who can screw up each others' life more. This was an interesting Christmas get together, especially with the guest visit from Marty Pepper, sitcom king. Was it the ultimate inside joke that everything passing before Marty's eyes was fodder for a TV show? Yes, I think so. At the end of the show, the final credit was "A Marty Pepper Production."

For more on Marty and Charlie's trouble making antics, read on.

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Ask TV Squad: Which DVDs to own

by Isabelle Carreau, posted Dec 9th 2009 6:19PM
DVDThe "Ask TV Squad" column, published every Wednesday, answers your questions about current and past TV shows, as well as about the celebrities appearing on TV. Every week, I will pick a question (or more) sent to us and provide answers in the column. If your question is not picked for a column, it may be answered in a subsequent column or in TV Squad's APB Podcast.

To submit questions to the "Ask TV Squad" column, you can post them below in comments or email them to asktvsquad@gmail.com.

This week, I follow up on the last "Ask TV Squad" about TV shows on DVD and answer a question about which TV DVDs you should own.

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Dress like Don Draper with Brooks Brothers' help

by Allison Waldman, posted Oct 15th 2009 12:03PM
mad_men_don_draperLately, Don Draper has not been coming off as a very nice guy on Mad Men. In fact, he's been a complete jerk. However, if there's one thing positive about the tall, dark and handsome ad man, he's a great dresser. Jon Hamm looks amazing in Don Draper's suits. Well, now so can you. Brooks Brothers is selling the Mad Men Edition suit for a mere $998. (Hey, that's not a grand, unless you count tax).

Don't dawdle, though. There's only 250 suits in the limited edition run. The look is inspired by the Mad Men 1960's Madison Avenue style, which could also be the How To Succeed in Business Without Really Trying look from the Broadway show or The Dick Van Dyke Show look, depending on your favorite reference point from the '60s.

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Best '60s TV Shows

by Kim Potts, posted Aug 24th 2009 4:00PM
Best Shows of the '60s Andy GriffithIn AOL TV's continuing countdown of the best TV shows of each decade, we travel back in time to the 1960s, when viewers were entertained by wacky sitcoms like 'Green Acres,' 'Bewitched' and 'The Addams Family,' a proliferation of Westerns that featured future superstars like Clint Eastwood and Michael Landon, variety shows like 'Laugh-In' and 'The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour' and James Bond-inspired spy shows like 'The Saint' and 'I Spy.'

Viewers were also into grittier fare like realistic cop dramas ('Ironside,' 'Adam-12') and war action series ('12 O'Clock High,' 'Combat!'), though there was plenty of classic sitcom fun on the airwaves, too, from 'The Andy Griffith Show' and 'The Dick Van Dyke Show' to 'Get Smart' and 'My Three Sons.'

Take a look at our picks of the decade's best and let us know if we got it right. -- By Kimberly Potts

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Mary Tyler Moore Interview for Best of the '70s TV

by Kim Potts, posted Jun 22nd 2009 6:01AM
Mary Tyler MooreShe won an Emmy as capri-pants-sporting '60s housewife Laura Petrie on 'The Dick Van Dyke Show' and earned an Oscar nod for her dramatic turn as an embittered mother in 'Ordinary People,' but for most fans, Mary Tyler Moore will always be Mary Richards, the WJM-TV employee who could turn the world on with her smile on 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show.'

As the seminal workplace comedy tops AOL TV's list of the best shows of the 1970s, the 72-year-old Moore, who won four Emmys for her 'MTM Show' performance, tells us which are her favorite episodes, why 'MTM' almost didn't make it to air, the current shows she'd like to guest-star on ... and what inspired her to attack a man with her fists.

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Carl Reiner checking in for House's season finale

by Allison Waldman, posted Mar 31st 2009 9:03AM
carl reiner ocean'sI adore Carl Reiner. There. I said it. What are you going to do about it? No, seriously, if there's another actor/writer/director/producer in show business who's made me laugh more than Mr. Reiner, I can't think of him/her right now. He's been one of Hollywood's prime time jewels for six decades. So, the news that Carl Reiner is guesting on the House season finale makes me very, very happy.

According to the House powers that be, Mr. Reiner will be a clinic patient at Princeton Plainsboro, and his interaction is slated to be with Dr. Cuddy. Good for Lisa Edelstein!

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Nine memorable TV shows about TV - VIDEO

by Allison Waldman, posted Mar 18th 2009 10:06AM
The Mary Tyler Moore Show

The success of Slumdog Millionaire and Frost/Nixon recently inspired me to assess the ten best movies about television. TV has been a fertile source of entertainment for filmmakers. The TV turf is also a popular setting for TV shows, and there have been some all-time great shows about the tube. Here are nine that I think warrant special recognition -- in no special order.

1. The Mary Tyler Moore Show
It all started at WJM-TV in Minneapolis. The Mary Tyler Moore Show was the perfect sitcom blend of home and work, and work happened to be the local TV news team. As Mary Richards, the associate producer, Mary Tyler Moore was the single girl America loved because she was real, funny, gorgeous and lovable. At work, the news was mangled nightly by Ted Baxter, the quintessential news reader anchorman who loved every dulcet tone of his voice and had no idea what he was reporting. In perfect irony, when the show came to an end, most everyone at WJM -- Lou Grant, Murray Slaughter, Sue Anne Nivens, Mary -- were fired. Only Ted was spared!

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Did Big Love go too far or was it no big deal?

by Allison Waldman, posted Mar 17th 2009 8:15PM
big love clan
Last week's episode of Big Love received more hype than any other show this season for one simple reason. The Church of Latter-Day-Saints (LDS) was protesting – in advance – the HBO drama depicting a secret church ritual. The church felt that the producers had gone too far by showing a sacred ceremony that was not meant to be revealed to those who are not members of the faith. While I respect their desire to protect their traditions, I think they should have waited till the show aired, because now that I've seen it, my attitude is simply this, "No big deal."

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Eight of TV's weirdest dreams - VIDEOS

by Danny Gallagher, posted Feb 19th 2009 11:04AM
There is no better way to get inside a character's head (without resorting to charging up some power cutting tools and laying down some newspaper) than writing in a dream sequence.

Some of them, however, try to explain too much or cover too much ground and end up becoming the kind of dreams that keeps our Paxil dosage high and GlaxoSmithKline's stock price higher.

These are those mindfreaks.

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Christine's adventure includes nod to Seinfeld

by Allison Waldman, posted Feb 13th 2009 9:02AM
SeinfeldThe New Adventures of Old Christine is one of my favorite sitcoms and last night's episode included what I saw as a tribute to TV icons Lucille Ball and Mary Tyler Moore, as well as Seinfeld. Yes, Julia Louis-Dreyfus had a true Elaine moment that was not only hilarious, but a real wink to her Seinfeld fans.

The CBS sitcom came up with a doozy of a situation, although it felt familiar to me, which I'll explain why in a moment. Christine was determined to prove that she was not afraid of living alone and wound up locked out of her house. She climbed back in through a bathroom window and got her foot stuck in the toilet bowl!

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Nine least-wanted TV neighbors - VIDEOS

by Danny Gallagher, posted Dec 29th 2008 11:03AM
Steve UrkelThe TV neighbor has served many useful roles over the years; some that many thought had been lost by the unrelenting sands of time.

They've become the great modern philosopher like Wilson, the evolving thinker like Bill Dauterive, the bearer of bad news like Newman, and even the court jester -- as long as you don't count one of these guys.

Not only would we not want some of them living next door to us, we wouldn't want them living. Period. These are the annoying next-door neighbors who should have been run out by the Neighborhood Homeowners' Association with torches and pitchforks.

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The Mad Men-Twilight Zone connection - VIDEOS

by Allison Waldman, posted Aug 25th 2008 3:04PM
Twilight ZoneRecently, when I interviewed Matt Weiner, the creator of AMC's Mad Men, we talked about the movies, books and television shows that influenced the inception of the show. The 1960 Oscar-winning best picture The Apartment was one, so were the sitcoms Dobie Gillis and The Dick Van Dyke Show.

Of all the television shows he mentioned, though, there was one that was the most influential. "You can't have the '60s without The Twilight Zone. It is a mind opening experience for a generation," said Matt. "It was not just science fiction, it dealt with social issues. It's filled with the texture of real life. Just the idea of having a show every week where you don't know who is going to be in it and what it's going to be about, to have this acceptance of the fact that we don't know everything about the world. That in itself was something."

Going through The Twilight Zone episode guide, there are quite a few shows in which you can see where Mad Men could find inspiration. Here's four that reminded me of Don and Betty and Pete and Sterling Cooper:

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Matt Weiner of Mad Men: The TV Squad Interview

by Allison Waldman, posted Aug 8th 2008 4:23PM
Matt Weiner Mad MenWhen Matt Weiner was a successful sitcom writer -- CBS's Becker -- he had this idea for another kind of show. He couldn't figure out how to pitch it, so he wrote a sample script. The Sopranos' creator David Chase read it and hired him. After copping a couple of Emmys for his work on that HBO drama, Weiner finally got his spec script sold. Now, Mad Men has earned 16 Emmy nominations and Matt Weiner is working on the second season of the show.

Recently, for TV Week, I interviewed Matt about the Emmy nominations. Here are some other thoughts he shared with me about Mad Men:

TVS: What's the show all about to you?

Matt Weiner: A lot of the episodes are about "who am I." A lot of the shows are about what's embarrassing. A lot of it's about denial, about how we juggle our work and our private lives. A lot of the issues that came up in the early 1960s are really hitting us right now.

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Frasier: Star Mitzvah - VIDEO

by Allison Waldman, posted Jul 10th 2008 10:03AM
Frasier- Niles and FrasThe bar mitzvah is a Jewish rite of passage, the time in a boy's life when he becomes a man -- symbolically -- by reading from the Torah. When a girl does the ritual, it's called a bat mitzvah. I mention all this because in TV, the bar/bat mitzvah has been the catalyst for some wonderful episodes, mostly on sitcoms.

The Simpsons celebrated Krusty the Klown's bar mitzvah in the episode "Today I Am A Klown," which was a variation on one of the all-time great sitcom bar mitzvahs of all time: the episode "Buddy Sorrell, Man and Boy," on The Dick Van Dyke Show. Square Pegs shared "Muffy's Bat Mitzvah" with viewers, and this past season, Curb Your Enthusiasm's Larry David used his friend Jeff Greene's daughter Sammi's bat mitzvah to announce that he never put a gerbil up his butt.

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