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April 17, 2014

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'Treme' Reviews

by Allyssa Lee, posted Apr 8th 2010 8:00PM
Set three months after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, HBO's new series 'Treme' follows, quite simply, a loosely-connected network of New Orleans residents as they struggle to pick up their lives in the wake of the disaster.

But given that this is the latest effort from David Simon -- the much-heralded creator of the seminal HBO series 'The Wire' -- this drama proves to be so much more than just that.

Those expecting a Big Easy version of 'The Wire,' however, are out of luck. This is no police drama, and the city's politics are largely unexplored. The series takes its title from Faubourg Tremé, the historic New Orleans neighborhood adjacent to the French Quarter thought to be the birthplace of jazz. And the music from this multi-cultural, multi-storied, proud yet battered city pulses like a heartbeat throughout.

There's been no shortage of talent gracing this drama. The ensemble cast includes 'Wire' vets Wendell Pierce (a New Orleans native) and Clarke Peters, Khandi Alexander, Kim Dickens, Melissa Leo, John Goodman and Steve Zahn, in his first regular TV series role. Guest appearances from musicians such as Allen Toussaint, Elvis Costello, Dr. John and Kermit Ruffins lend authenticity.

Nor has there been a shortage of media coverage leading up to 'Treme's April 11 premiere. Sadly, part of that has been due to the unexpected death of one of the team's writers, David Mills. But 'Treme' is also being hailed as more than just another television program: It's an event. While some have noted the series' meandering pace, many critics have been praising Simon and co-creator Eric Overmyer's new series for its ability to immediately transport viewers on a musical journey into the heartbeat and the heartbreak of this weird and wonderful city.

Read what the critics had to say after the jump.

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John Goodman Back on TV with HBO's 'Treme'

by Nick Zaino, posted Apr 6th 2010 9:25AM
John Goodman in David Simon and Eric Overmyer's 'Treme' on HBOThere's already a lot of excitement over HBO's new series 'Treme,' and for good reason. The series, which debuts Sunday, is the brainchild of David Simon and Eric Overmyer, who gave us five wonderful seasons of 'The Wire' on HBO. And this series, which tells the story of post-Katrina New Orleans through the lens of a struggling musician and the community around him, looks full of potential with the same kind of quality we came to expect from 'The Wire' and Simon and Overmyer's 'Homicide' series.

Perhaps a smaller storyline is John Goodman's return to a regular TV series. Goodman has been in a couple of short-lived sitcoms ('Normal, Ohio' and 'Center of the Universe'), has appeared often on 'Saturday Night Live,' and done some voice-over work and cameos (he had a particularly good stretch on 'The West Wing'). So he has kept a somewhat steady television presence.

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'Treme' Writer David Mills Dies After Collapsing on Set

by Bob Sassone, posted Mar 31st 2010 10:55AM
Treme
Sad news coming out of the New Orleans set of the new HBO series 'Treme': writer and producer David Mills collapsed Tuesday on the set and later passed away at a local hospital. According to the Times-Picayune site, Mills had a brain aneurysm.

Mills was head writer and producer on the show, which is about how a group of people of New Orleans rebuild their lives after Hurricane Katrina. Mills won two Emmys for his writing and producing on the HBO miniseries 'The Corner' and wrote for several other shows as well, including 'ER,' 'Homicide: Life on the Street,' 'Kingpin,' 'NYPD Blue,' and was a story editor on the CBS drama 'Picket Fences.' He also wrote for several newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

'Treme' premieres on April 11.

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Behind-the-Scenes of HBO's 'Treme' (New Video!)

by Chris Harnick, posted Mar 29th 2010 2:20PM
TremeWith a strong cast of actors, award-winning veteran creators and a setting that has been a hotbed of controversy, heartache and celebration for years, HBO's 'Treme' (premiering Sun., April 11, 10PM ET) has been set up to be a hit for the cable network

Set three months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the series will focus on how the neighborhood of Treme is rebuilding. The series comes from David Simon, creator of HBO's 'The Wire' and his collaborator on 'The Wire' and 'Homicide: Life on the Street,' Eric Overmyer.

'Treme' stars quite a few familiar faces such as Steve Zahn in his first series regular role, Khandi Alexander, John Goodman and Wendell Pierce.

Check out the video after the jump.

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Here's the Trailer for David Simon's 'Treme'

by Bob Sassone, posted Mar 17th 2010 1:36PM
All some TV viewers have to see in this trailer for the new HBO drama 'Treme' are the words "From the creators of 'The Wire'." But even if you didn't watch that show you might be impressed by this cast: Khandi Alexander, Steve Zahn, John Goodman, Clarke Peters, Rob Brown, Kim Dickens, Wendell Pierce. It's about New Orleans and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and premieres April 11.

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The Wire's David Simon takes on Post-Katrina New Orleans in Treme - TCA Report

by Joel Keller, posted Jan 15th 2010 1:29PM
David Simon, Wendell Pierce, and Eric Overmyer promoting Treme at the Winter 2010 TCAsIf there was anyone working in TV today who could create an accurate, in-depth portrait of post-Katrina New Orleans, it's David Simon. Many people call Simon's previous HBO series, The Wire, one of the greatest dramas of all time, and they do it for a reason: it has rich characterizations, well-examined stories, and it gives viewers a real feel for the underbelly of Baltimore.

So, with Treme, debuting on HBO in April, Simon tries to examine the lives of ten people who are trying to pull things together three months after Hurricane Katrina flooded out New Orleans.

"New Orleans, to me, represents a place where it's a triumph of American urban culture," said Simon. It's what - it's the best that an American city can be and also the worst in a lot of ways, as I said before, but it has created a culture that has gone around the world."

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HBO Orders Follow-Up to 'When the Levees Broke,' Sets 'Treme' Premiere Date

by Michael D. Ayers, posted Jan 15th 2010 12:25PM
HBO has announced that Spike Lee's Peabody Award winning documentary 'When the Levees Broke: A Requiem In Four Acts' will be getting the follow-up treatment.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, the documentary is set to start shooting today, with Lee taking his eye on New Orleans and the Katrina aftermath five years later. Lee's original series won accolades for its compelling depiction of New Orleans' citizens and how they coped within the aftermath of the tragedy.

The project is set to debut in Summer 2010.

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David Simon's Treme gets a teaser trailer and a premiere date

by Mike Moody, posted Jan 11th 2010 2:01PM
treme logo hbo
David Simon, creator of The Wire, is shifting his lens from the mean streets of Baltimore to post-Katrina New Orleans with Treme. The HBO series is set in a Crescent City neighborhood rich in Créole and African American history. Unlike The Wire, Treme will tighten its scope to focus on the musicians and working class people living among the city's ongoing reconstruction efforts.

The Wire was a dense and sprawling tale, unearthing corruption and secrets everywhere from grimy back alleys to city hall. Treme's reportedly smaller scope recalls Simon's first series, Homicide: Life on the Street. The pioneering NBC drama centered on the tough and streetwise detectives sweating away at a Baltimore police precinct. Simply put, the show was a masterpiece that offered a rich, compelling and sometimes avant-garde micro-study of overworked cops.

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All Jonathan wants for Festivus

by Jonathan Toomey, posted Dec 11th 2009 6:09PM
David Simon on the set of 'Treme.'
Festivus is upon us once again here at TV Squad and regardless of whether or not I've been naughty or nice, all my wishes had better come true because I've already sat through all ten crappy episodes of FlashForward -- I deserve all this.

  • First off, as you can probably tell by the picture above, I've got high hopes for David Simon's upcoming HBO drama Treme. Set in a post-Katrina New Orleans, I am in no way asking for this show to be The Wire meets the bayou, but I do want it to be good. Judging by the cast (Wire alums Wendell Pierce and Clarke Peters, Steve Zahn, and Khandi Alexander to name a few), I'd say Simon already has another hit on his hands.

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David Simon says advertising is ruining television

by Bob Sassone, posted Sep 1st 2009 11:02AM
Josephine the PlumberEveryone has an opinion about TV commercials. Some people think that advertising is a cancer that has to be erased, and they fast forward through all of the ads when they record a show. Other people love advertising and understand that commercials pay for a lot of our entertainment options (I would put myself in that category). David Simon, creator of The Wire, is in the former category. Is he right?

Is advertising ruining TV?
Yes! TV would be better without ads.227 (35.2%)
Yes, but we have to live with it.210 (32.6%)
No, ads help pay for shows.207 (32.1%)


[via TV Tattle]

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Jane After Dark: The Wire - season four ends, alliances shift

by Jane Boursaw, posted Jul 26th 2009 6:00PM
The Wire, Season 4, Final Grades, Bodie

Well, well, well. How interesting to see the purchase of the nail gun we saw in the first episode of season four of The Wire come back around to bring everything together. "It's a tomb," says Freamon in "A New Day," and it all makes sense to me. Well, some of it makes sense anyway.

And then there's the teetering decision of whether Freamon will keep getting crap from the higher-ups about going out and looking for Marlo's bodies, using up manpower, and upping the murder rate of the city, or whether they'll do the right thing and actually do their jobs. Oh, the bodies that rolled in.

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Is The Wire the biggest Emmy snub of all time, forever and ever, amen?

by Danny Gallagher, posted Jul 20th 2009 10:01AM
The Emmy nomination process is clearly more flawed than a line of Dora the Explorer lawn darts.

The system is outdated and always in need of a revamping, as technology and the proliferation of programming increases every year. Some contenders are just going to get a big, ugly, high school prom date snub.

That doesn't mean the process is without its no-brainers. I'm referring, of course, to the shows that deserve special recognition for changing the course of the medium and showing the world its possibilities and not to the people actually doing the nominating. The last season of The Wire will go down as one of the biggest no-brainers of all time.

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Jane After Dark: The Wire, season 4 - The kids are not alright

by Jane Boursaw, posted Jul 19th 2009 1:01PM
The Wire - Season 4
I'm well into season four of The Wire (just finished "Margin of Error"; read my other Jane After Dark installments), and getting into the guts of the Baltimore political scene and how it's all interwoven with the cops and drug business.

Oh, those kids! It really makes you see how they've gotta be extremely driven to get out of that life, because a lot of the adults are just priming them to continue the drug business into the next generation. Not only their parents -- which is really sad -- but people like Marlo, who has his minions handing out back-to-school cash to build goodwill with the kids. At that rate, those kids don't have a shot of clawing their way out of a life of crime.

It will take me another run-through or two to really fit all the pieces together, but I'm digging how all of the characters have evolved ... or not ...

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Jane After Dark: The Wire, season three - Oh, Stringer!

by Jane Boursaw, posted Jul 12th 2009 10:03AM
The Wire - Middle Ground

Well, holy cow. I did not see that coming, although from what you've all said, I was prepared for just about anything to happen on The Wire. Except that!

I feel like season three ended on a high note. Well, sort of ... at least for McNulty, now walking the beat in the Western Division. Even though he's wearing a uniform, which is just weird for him, he's talking and laughing with the residents, and that's really what it's all about. And Rhonda and Cedric are together (oh, that chiseled butt of his!).

Even with all the busts, though, the drug business sails onward, with Marlo moving up in the hierarchy and Dennis' boxing gym virtually deserted, all the kids lured back into the streets. But mostly, season three was all about Episode 11, "Middle Ground"; in particular, a few penultimate scenes...

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Jane After Dark: The Wire, season 3 - Stringer wears a suit, Omar gets rash

by Jane Boursaw, posted Jul 5th 2009 2:05PM
The Wire, season 3 - Omar and Bunk
After a brief break to watch season four of Weeds last week, Jane After Dark is back with The Wire. I'm half-way into season three, and while there are definitely parts of this show that put me to sleep (ducking and running for cover), it's still a brilliant drama. My teenage son popped in for part of an episode, decided it was too "real," and promptly lost interest.

To help me organize my thoughts, let's take a look at a few characters:

Stringer Bell.
I'm really digging Idris Elba dressed up in his fancy suit, running the real estate company, working with government officials, and holding drug meetings using Robert's Rules of Order. It's fascinating that there's this whole hierarchy within the gangs that most of them respect and follow.

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