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October 21, 2014

fairy tales

NBC Gives 'Grimm' a Full Season and a New Night

by Catherine Lawson, posted Nov 22nd 2011 7:45AM
Well, we were right: The ax-wielders over at NBC have decided to give fledgling drama 'Grimm' time to find its feet and develop an audience. 'Entertainment Weekly' reports that the network has placed a full series order, making 'Grimm' the only new NBC hour-long series to get a "back nine" episode order this fall.

NBC President, Robert Greenblatt, said "We are very pleased to be making a full-season commitment for 'Grimm.' This series is turning the traditional procedural drama on its head and is attracting a loyal following for us on Friday nights. We love where it's going creatively and we're excited to deliver more episodes to our audience."

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Prince Charming Saves Baby Emma From the Curse on 'Once Upon a Time' (VIDEO)

by Jason Hughes, posted Oct 24th 2011 2:45AM
'Once Upon a Time' - 'Pilot'The Alphabet fired the first volley in the great 2011 war of the fairy tales with the premiere of 'Once Upon a Time' (Sun., 8PM ET on ABC). The Peacock returns fire with 'Grimm' this Friday, though at first glance the two series look to be very different.

Framed much like a fairy tale itself, 'Time' sees the fairy tale characters trapped in Storybrook, Maine. There time stands still thanks to a curse from the Evil Queen (Lana Parrilla), who herself fell victim to the curse. That appears to be part of her plan, though. That said, it's unclear if the "human" Queen, who is the mayor of Storybrook, knows the truth or not.

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'Once Upon a Time' Set Visit: The Cast Explains How They're Breathing New Life Into Old Stories

by Laura Prudom, posted Oct 21st 2011 1:15PM
Jennifer MorrisonI'm not being hyperbolic when I say that ABC's 'Once Upon a Time' is unlike anything you've seen on television before. Its closest relative is probably a little-watched NBC miniseries called 'The 10th Kingdom' which aired in 2000, at least in the way it blends classic fairytales with the modern world to offer a whole new interpretation of pop culture's most familiar yarns.

'Once' also shares a certain amount of DNA with 'Lost,' since it was created by Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz, who wrote for the mystery series for the duration of its run (you can read Mo Ryan's recent interview with the duo here). But in its ideas, execution, and undeniable sense of whimsy, 'Once' is a unique creature, accessible to viewers from ages eight to 80.

Earlier this month, AOL TV visited the Vancouver set of the fantasy drama, wandering through the enchanting streets of fictional Storybrooke and talking with the cast about how the show is evolving so far. Join us after the jump for a hint of what you can expect when the show premieres on Sunday (8PM ET, ABC), and come back next week for a deeper look. Mild spoilers ahead.

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Syfy Planning More Unique Spins on Fairy Tales

by Bryan Enk, posted Feb 2nd 2010 11:00AM
Once upon a time, in an enchanted television land known as Syfy ... The Hollywood Reporter brings news that Syfy will continue to put its own unique twists and turns on classic fairy tales following the premiere of 'Beauty and the Beast' later this month.

The network will air five titles based on familiar stories, including 'Hansel and Gretel' and 'Little Red Riding Hood.' The films will be part of the network's popular Saturday night movie franchise, which features low-budget, original genre projects produced in association with several independent studios.

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Syfy Updates Fairy Tales for Movie Franchise

by Brad Trechak, posted Feb 1st 2010 10:00AM

SyFySyFy has been reinventing things with mixed success. They have 'Battlestar Galactica', their gold standard, but they also have 'Flash Gordon' and numerous other bombs. They've also had mini-series based on classic tales like 'The Wizard of Oz' and 'Alice in Wonderland'. Now, they're going to even older stories by creating a television movie franchise based on classic fairy tales. One benefit of this idea is that nobody is owed any creator fees as most fairy tales are in the public domain.

Of course, much like their previous mini-series such as 'Tin Man' and 'Alice', these stories will have a modern, adult spin. For example, 'Hansel and Gretel' will now become a revenge flick. 'Little Red Riding Hood' could very well turn into a copy of 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' where Red hunts down werewolves.

This idea might work, and some of the movies might even become backdoor pilots if done well enough (despite the limited budget of each). Of course, this concept has already sort of been done with DC Comics' 'Fables' series, but using that directly would involve paying for rights.

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How do Klingons make vegetarian lasagna?

by Anna Johns, posted Feb 12th 2006 8:24AM
worf klingon recipeWell, first you need to invite over a vegetarian and get him talking. Then, when he's comfortable, catch him by surprise and "beat him to death with a sack of phone books".

Thus begins the Klingon recipe for vegetarian lasagna, according to humorist Mike Richardson-Bryan over at McSweeneys. Richardson-Bryan also wrote Klingon recipes for Homestyle Gagh, Heart of Targ, Thing on a Stick (a.k.a. Bachelor's Delight) and Tribble Nuggets, which involve a lot of shooting and then stomping Tribbles into nuggets. Funny stuff. Also check out the writer's Klingon Personal Ads and Klingon Fairy Tales for McSweeneys.

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