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November 23, 2014

jason omara

Review: 'Terra Nova' Brings Dino Drama to TV, But Will It Live Up to Its Potential?

by Maureen Ryan, posted Sep 26th 2011 10:00AM
Many expectations are riding on the scaly backs of the dinosaurs of 'Terra Nova' (8PM ET Monday, Fox). The two-hour pilot for this action-adventure series encountered more than its share of production hiccups and the entire enterprise chomped a whole lot of Fox's money.

The good news is, most that money is up on the screen (the cash that's not going to Steven Spielberg and the show's other 11 executive producers, that is). 'Terra Nova's' expansive vistas and action scenes look spiffy, and if you like to see humans battle dinosaurs in HD, you're likely to be satisfied by the workmanlike but effective story told in the pilot.

But the long-term future of 'Terra Nova,' which is set 85 million years in the past, hinges on which of two very different questions it's going to answer. If it chooses to focus on whether the generic Shannon family can rebuild itself, all the dino antics in the world probably won't save it from falling into a tar pit of predictable, sub-Spielbergian sentimentality.

The most interesting question 'Terra Nova' could answer is this: What problems and baggage does a society bring to its efforts to reinvent itself?

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Jon Cryer, Claire Danes Among Six New Presenters Named for the Emmys

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 14th 2011 7:20AM
Emmys logoThis year's Emmys are just a few days away, and to whet our appetite ahead of Sunday night's ceremony, organizers have announced the names of six new presenters.

'Two and a Half Men' star Jon Cryer, who is up for a Best Supporting Actor award this year, will be joined on the presenting roster by actors from both established shows and upcoming new ones.

The other five presenters announced Wednesday are: Bryan Cranston ('Breaking Bad'), Scott Caan ('Hawaii Five-0'), Claire Danes ('Homeland'), Kerry Washington ('Scandal') and Jason O'Mara ('Terra Nova').

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Meet the Cast of Fox's 'Terra Nova,' Steven Spielberg's Pricey New Sci-Fi Show (VIDEO)

by Maggie Furlong, posted Mar 9th 2011 6:00PM
Fox's 'Terra Nova' has made more headlines before premiering than most shows will snag in their entire TV life. Unfortunately, most of them have been about how insanely expensive the series has been to produce.

Fox's 'Terra Nova'

Some sites report that the pilot cost around $10 million, while other insiders claim that number is closer to $20 million. Either way, Fox realized that the Australia-based, Steven Spielberg-produced production -- complete with a large main cast and some prehistoric extras -- was an investment, which is why they've already ordered 13 episodes.

So what does $20 million (allegedly) buy you? The gorgeous sweeping landscapes of Australia are the perfect backdrop for this journey all the way back to dinosaur times. Yes, dinosaurs and people will be living together as humans from a not-so-happy future travel back 85 million years to recolonize.

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More Time Traveling in Store for Jason O'Mara

by Catherine Lawson, posted Jun 21st 2010 8:40AM
Jason O'Mara ('Life on Mars') has signed on to star in FOX's ambitious new drama series, 'Terra Nova.'

The big-budget spectacle will be executive produced by powerhouses Steven Spielberg ('The Pacific'), Peter Chernin, Brannon Braga ('FlashForward') and David Fury ('Lost'), and will reportedly use writers from the now-defunct '24.'

O'Mara will play Jim Shannon, a father in the year 2149 on a dying planet who travels back in time with his family to the pre-historic era to help colonists rebuild civilization from the ground up. Stars who were previously thought to be considering the role include Kyle Chandler ('Friday Night Lights').

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O'Mara May Join Fox's 'Terra Nova'

by Nick Zaino, posted Jun 7th 2010 12:40PM
Jason O'MaraDeadline.com is reporting that Jason O'Mara, best known for his role on the American adaptation of the time-traveling drama 'Life On Mars,' is in talks to star in 'Terra Nova,' another time-traveling drama from producer Steven Spielberg. Entertainment Weekly's Hollywood Insider blog is also reporting they have confirmed the story with a "key insider."

In ABC's 'Life On Mars,' O'Mara played Detective Sam Tyler, a New York City police officer sent back to the 1970s after a car crash. Despite a heavyweight cast that included Harvey Keitel, Michael Imperioli and Gretchen Mol, the show was canceled after 17 episodes and a major overhaul.

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Life on Mars: Life is a Rock (series finale)

by Brad Trechak, posted Apr 2nd 2009 1:12AM
Life on Mars(S01E17) It's the last episode ever of the American version of this show. I'm not sure if it's appropriate or not, but it happened on April Fool's Day, as well. They certainly took the show to its most literal conclusion possible. As I write this, I'm still processing a lot of the story.

Comparisons are inevitable, and the ending of the British series was hands-down better. However, this one was good for a couple of laughs and wasn't completely outrageous (close, but not completely).

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On the Set: 'Life on Mars'

by Andrew Scott, posted Apr 1st 2009 6:00AM
Life on MarsTonight marks the series finale of ABC's 'Life on Mars.'

The show, an American version of a Brit series of the same name, stars Jason O'Mara, Harvey Keitel, Michael Imperioli and Gretchen Mol and developed a cult following despite only one season on the airwaves.

Unfortunately, there weren't enough fans to warrant a second installment. (Reminding us of that other recent short-lived '70s-set series 'Swingtown' -- oh, 1970s, why must all the good shows that depict your awesome polyester wardrobes, feathery hairstyles and outrageously outdated mores be killed off so quickly? We're not counting 'That '70s Show,' and we think you know why.)

But, ahem, AOL TV was granted an exclusive on set visit to 'LOM,' where we got our '70s fix, but good.

So what was life actually like on 'Mars'? Read through our post to see the highlights (and then shed a tear for the passing of this fine, fine show -- we're nostalgic already).

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Life on Mars: Everyone Knows It's Windy

by Brad Trechak, posted Mar 26th 2009 1:38AM
Life on Mars(S01E16) In our second-to-last episode, we get a few revelations about Sam and the reason behind his trip to 1973. Nothing conclusive, of course, but that's probably been saved for next week. Will Sam get back to 2009? Will he die? Will he get hit by another car and wake up in 1938? The mind boggles.

Sam is really adapting to his environment and becoming more brutal in his police work. Being stuck in a 1973 cop show is really rubbing off on him. On the plus side, even a bullet can't keep Michael Imperioli from delivering a great performance while in surgery. I think I'll miss you the most, Ray.

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Life on Mars: All the Young Dudes

by Brad Trechak, posted Mar 19th 2009 12:31AM
Life on Mars

(S01E15)
Well, that was quite an ending, wasn't it? I admit I wasn't expecting that one. One cannot help but wonder if at that stage of filming, the creators were aware of the cancellation of the series and decided to throw in a few curve balls to create an "anything can happen" atmosphere and keep the loyal viewers on their toes.

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Life on Mars: Coffee, Tea or Annie

by Brad Trechak, posted Mar 12th 2009 1:06AM
Life on mars: Coffee Tea or Annie

(S01E14)
The more I watch this show, the more I think Sam is not stuck in the past. I'm not sure where he is. It's definitely somewhere fictional. My guess is some virtual reality thing. However, they further proved how unrealistic the show is by pulling out the old "identical twin from the middle of nowhere" trick. It saves casting time and money by using the same actor or actress for two different roles.

I don't care how similar two people look. There are minor differences in things such as voice and mannerisms that anybody who even remotely knew Valerie would have picked up that Annie was not her. Also, if Valerie was such a loner, how is it that she worked with her two roommates yet supposedly they didn't know her that well? If they saw her both at home and work and didn't figure out the switch, then I'm sorry, but they are a few bricks short of a load.

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Life on Mars: Revenge of the Broken Jaw

by Brad Trechak, posted Mar 5th 2009 2:27AM
Life on Mars(S01E13) Now that it has been made public of the imminent demise of Life on Mars, it certainly makes any sort of analysis kind of moot. Hopefully, when the series ends (a mere one episode longer than the series that spawned it), it will offer some sort of satisfying closure to its fans (all three of them).

Tonight's episode was a good one with a twist I didn't see until just before it actually happened. Once again, it focused more on the cop mystery of the week rather than Sam's predicament (which was only touched upon with the strange freeze frames in the beginning). The creators will likely have a hell of a lot of exposition about Sam in the final episode.

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Life on Mars promising closure in series finale (yeah, it's canceled)

by Jason Hughes, posted Mar 3rd 2009 10:02AM
Harvey Keitel and Jason O'Mara in Life on MarsYou know how those wacky British like their shows in short bursts with beginnings, middles and ends? Well maybe that's what ABC is thinking of when they announce that Life on Mars will finish its run with its 17th episode. They're promising a satisfying sense of closure, including answers as to why Detective Sam Tyler finds himself in 1973.

One theory that we're told can be ruled out is the coma that the UK original used to explain Sam Tyler's time travel. It would make the mystery kind of anticlimactic if they used the same explanation. We're also not told if Annie will finally punch Ray once and for all for being a misogynist bastard

The UK version of the series was an actual hit, but designed for the limited format completing two eight-episode runs. Meaning the US iteration, which is being canceled due to low ratings, will still run one episode longer than its successful predecessor. It was a creative decision to end the UK series after two seasons.

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Life on Mars: The Simple Secret of the Note in Us All

by Brad Trechak, posted Feb 26th 2009 3:02AM
Life on Mars(S01E12) To begin, I know exactly where they shot the opening scene for tonight's episode. It was in the New York Transit Museum. It's an old subway station that was converted into a museum and includes subway cars from different decades. I visited there recently, which allowed me to recognize some of the background advertisements from the scene.

In the original British series, it was determined that Sam was in a coma. In this series, I think he's in some sort of shared virtual reality. This is simply a hunch based on what we've learned so far.

On to the actual episode...

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Life on Mars: Home Is Where You Hang Your Holster

by Brad Trechak, posted Feb 18th 2009 11:55PM
Life on Mars: Home is Where You Hang Your Holster
(S01E11)
It's been a while since Sam had his visions. I missed them. However, I think tonight's episode overdid it a little with the Wizard of Oz references. Sam is over the rainbow. We got it. We just don't know why.

I'm glad the creators wrapped up the Maria storyline as quickly as they did. They could only milk her daddy issues for so long, and Sam and Gene have way too much for a bromance going on of their own to let a little thing like sleeping with the boss' daughter interfere.

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Life on Mars: Let All the Children Boogie

by Brad Trechak, posted Feb 12th 2009 1:02AM
Life on Mars(S01E10) Every dramatic series has the occasional "comedy" episode, and Life on Mars is no exception. This one was definitely intended for humor which could be confirmed by the cameo appearance of Wallace "Inconceivable" Shawn, who apparently ran The X-Files a few decades before Mulder and Scully investigated the paranormal.

This was a good episode and served several purposes. The first of which was to determine that whatever happened to Sam is not any sort of alien-related experience, thereby getting the most silly and cliché theories out of the way. My only question at this stage is whether the explanation for Sam's predicament is going to be scientific, magical or a combination of both (technomancy, perhaps?). The episode added to the confusion about this by nicknaming Wallace Shawn's forensic investigator "The Sorcerer."

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