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April 23, 2014

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'Human Target' at Comic Con: Make Way for the Ladies -- and William Shatner?

by Michael Maloney, posted Jul 25th 2010 1:50PM
human_target_fox'Human Target' is back for a second season. It has a new executive producer Matthew Miller ('Chuck'), who told thousands of fans at Comic Con on Saturday that he's bringing some ladies into Christopher Chance's life.

Indira Varma ('Rome') becomes not only Chance's new client but also his new boss. "She plays a woman who's married to a 'Paul Allen' type, who dies under mysterious circumstances," previews Miller. "She decides that the team has some value and she takes it over. She becomes a female Charlie [Townsend], giving the guys access to a billionaire's toys -- her jets, cars. It'll give the show an international feel."

Miller says the team will also get a new female member, who hasn't been cast yet. "She's a little younger [than Varma's character], 22 years old. She's a thief with a background more similar to Chance and Guerrero's.

"Guys just love to have a woman tell them what to do," chuckles series regular Chi McBride (Winston.) "It'll set up great tension and comedy. Indira isn't bad to look at [either]!"

Fans asked if Mark Valley's real-life military training helps him play Chance. "We had some training when I was a freshman at West Point," he recalls. "We fought with these sticks. I really hit a guy [with mine] and he got angry and beat me up."

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Christopher Chance and Baptiste Face Off on 'Human Target' (VIDEO)

by Jane Boursaw, posted Mar 18th 2010 12:55AM
Human Target, Baptiste and Chance FightThe downside of training someone with your awesome assassin skills is that you never know when you might have to face off against them. Christopher Chance learned that the hard way when he and Baptiste had it out on 'Human Target' (Wed., 8PM ET on Fox).

But they must be evenly matched because both were standing after the fight, and Baptiste even managed to blow up a building in the process. Everyone made it out, though. Bollocks!

Watch the video after the jump.

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Review: The Prisoner - Part Six: Checkmate

by Jason Hughes, posted Nov 18th 2009 1:30AM
The Prisoner: Checkmate
(E06)
Well, that's that. All wrapped up nice and neat with a bow. Glad it's all cleared up and everything makes perfect sense... Did you read the sarcasm in that statement?

At this point, I can't tell if fans of the original The Prisoner will embrace this new iteration of the concept, or feel betrayed by it. Don't get me wrong, once all the secrets lie revealed, they've developed a pretty neat concept, and on that could quite possibly have sustained more than six episodes even. But was it The Prisoner?

I will give credit to all of the actors for their conviction in these roles. Ruth Wilson and Jamie Campbell Bower were particularly impressive as 313 and 1112. The layers of emotion that 313 displayed in her closing scenes with Two, and later with Six were just tragically beautiful. And 1112... well, tragedy appears to be the name of the game in the new Prisoner.

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Review: The Prisoner - Part Four: Darling

by Jason Hughes, posted Nov 17th 2009 1:32AM
The Prisoner: Darling
(E04) If you cannot break a man with family, or mistrust, then you must try love. For love is the greatest of things after all, is it not?


it seems we've fallen into a familiar pattern with The Prisoner. Two tries various schemes and techniques to break Six and Six resists them all, either through his own ingenuity or through the help of other Villagers who are sympathetic to his situation. But we still don't know why Two is trying to break Six. This week's tactic was love, but love was explored in many ways throughout the episode.

Six's love of the woman from New York is so strong that it cross boundaries from that world into the Village world. But in neither case is it clear if the love is real, or something manufactured.

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Review: The Prisoner - Part Three: Anvil

by Jason Hughes, posted Nov 17th 2009 12:29AM
The Prisoner: Anvil
(E03) I'm no closer to figuring out everything that's going on, but I am more appreciative of the fact that the entire story will be done by tomorrow night. Things are so confusing at times, I'm not sure I can keep it all in my brain if I had to wait a full week between each of these episodes.

Tonight's installment focused on espionage and spying. The target of all this spying appears to be everyone, but the primary focus is on the "Dreamers," those people who have dreams and vision of a life outside the Village. You see, they're a dangerous element, particularly if they were to organize.

The leading suspicion is that they have already done so, but where and to what end? Two wants to find them so he can send them all down for "Treatment," while Six wants to find them so he can rally them to his own cause of finding a way out of the Village.

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Review: The Prisoner - Part Two: Harmony

by Jason Hughes, posted Nov 15th 2009 11:02PM
The Prisoner: Harmony
(E02) The whole strategy behind the Village has been turned on its head and it's certainly interesting to watch. Two is bound and determined to have everyone who lives there believe that the Village is all there is, there is no world outside of the Village and the Village is all they've ever known. He's even got tangible proof to back that up.

It's an interesting change from the original, and again makes you wonder just who would be willing to invest this kind of money into a bizarre prison like this. Is the citizenry drugged, or just brainwashed? Why is Six so adamant that he is not a number, he is a free man, if no one else in the village is so sure? Or are they just being more quiet about it?

We've even reached the point in the series where as a viewer I'm not sure if what I'm seeing is real, much less what Six is seeing and experiencing. But it was nice to meet his brother and see that he has a family in the Village. "Uncle Six" indeed.

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Review: The Prisoner - Part One: Arrival

by Jason Hughes, posted Nov 15th 2009 10:00PM
The Prisoner
(E01) I can't help but feel tempted to compare this to the Patrick McGoohan classic from the '60s, but that wouldn't be fair. Attitudes, technologies and even our expectations of TV programming have changed so much in the intervening time. And yet, as an homage to the original, there are many elements to this new AMC mini-series that nod back to the classic paranoia suspense saga.

While The Village has been updated to be a much larger and more vibrant desert oasis (think kitschy Las Vegas) than the original's sleepy seaside villas, it's still as much an enigma, even in this first hour. And while Jim Caviezel doesn't command the role of Number 6 as powerfully as McGoohan, really who could? So I give him a pass, and enjoy him for what he brings, and try not to hear McGoohan's booming defiance when Caviezel shouts: "I am not a number! I am a free man!"

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The Prisoner -- An early look

by Jason Hughes, posted Nov 14th 2009 7:05PM
Jim Caviezel and Ian McKellan, The PrisonerThe first thing I noticed about AMC's reboot of the classic Patrick McGoohan series The Prisoner was its style. The original is a very stylized piece of work, but as someone who didn't see it back in 1967-1968 when it first aired -- I'm not that old! -- I'm not sure if its visual presentation was wholly unique in itself, or more a reflection of the '60s style in general. Certainly the '60s have become infamous for some weird fashion and design choices.

Some of that '60s nostalgia creeped into the architecture and dress of the Villagers this time around without overwhelming the tone, and I think it's a wonderful homage to the original. But I'm more impressed that this re-imagining manages to capture the same sense of paranoia and confusion that the first did, without simply retelling the same story in the same way. And it's those differences that are truly modernizing the story in a great way.

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Review: Lie to Me - Grievous Bodily Harm

by Jonathan Toomey, posted Oct 27th 2009 11:37AM
An old friend (guest star Lennie James, R) involves Lightman (Tim Roth, L) in a dangerous deal in the LIE TO ME episode 'Grievous Bodily Harm.'
(S02E05) "It's always the popular ones who think they can get away with murder." - Loker

Easily the best episode of Lie to Me to date, I have to wonder -- I can't be the only out there who's just dying to know more about Cal's past, right? Lennie James guest-starred as Terry Marsh, one of Cal's old crime pals and his arrival created so many questions that have just pushed aside anything else going on at The Lightman Group. Unless Gillian or Loker turn out to be serial killers from past lives, nothing else really matters right now besides Cal's history.

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Gone Too Soon: Jericho

by Jason Hughes, posted Oct 5th 2009 11:28AM
Jericho
The modern poster-child for a show that's "gone too soon" is Jericho. The impassioned fans buried CBS under a ton of nuts, which got the show renewed for a shortened second season. Your mileage of the quality of that season may vary, but the fact remains that the fans did something none of these internet campaigns today will be able to.

What people don't realize is that when Jericho came back for the second run, the ratings weren't any better than when the first season ended. So when they cancel your favorite show and you start mailing in bizarre objects and setting up your web petitions because "it worked for Jericho," remember that the networks remember Jericho as well. They remember that it failed to find a sizable audience twice.

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NBC Delays 'Southland' & More TV News

by Andrew Scott, posted Aug 27th 2009 12:30PM
SouthlandNBC pushes 'Southland' to October, Josh Schwartz lands a comedy deal with NBC, Style renews 'Giuliana & Bill' and more of today's top TV headlines.

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Jericho alternate ending - VIDEO

by Erin Martell, posted Jun 12th 2008 1:05PM
Lennie JamesMost Jericho fans already know that two finales were filmed: one series finale and one season finale. When CBS canceled the show, viewers were given a neat, positive end to the series. Video of Jericho's alternate ending was recently released, and now we know what the season's cliffhanger would have looked like.

If you read Carol Barbee's description of the original Jericho finale, the clip won't tell you anything you don't already know. It's still cool to watch how everything plays out, though. I don't expect to see Lennie James as Robert Hawkins ever again, so I'll take what I can get. Check out the video after the jump.

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Goodbye Jericho

by Bob Sassone, posted Mar 21st 2008 5:32PM

Jericho logoThe nuts campaign convinced CBS to give us another (short) season of Jericho, but now it looks like the show is indeed canceled for good.

The network told producers yesterday that they are not giving another season to the nuclear attack drama. The show had filmed two endings for the seven episode second season: one a cliffhanger in case the show was renewed for another season, and the other an ending that would serve as an ending to the show and satisfy fans. It's the latter that will air on March 25. While the episode does indeed leave room for a continuation, I think we can say it's really gone for good this time.

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Jericho: Termination for Cause

by Paul Goebel, posted Mar 12th 2008 8:44AM

Lennie James(S02E05) "I think we have a problem." - Goetz, master of understatement

Well, I guess if anyone had doubts about the evilness of Goetz, those doubts should be erased as of this episode. I actually got chills thinking about Mimi recovering and telling the truth about what happened at the farm.

Goetz already lost four men and taking a hospital full of deputies is considerably more difficult than taking out one little girl with a shotgun. Goetz either really wants Mimi dead, has some Hawkins-sized stones or both.

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Jericho cast and crew go to convention, but fans don't

by Bob Sassone, posted Feb 22nd 2008 10:56AM

Jericho logoJericho fans, it might be time to grab your nuts again.

Last weekend, Jericho fans got a special treat at the Los Angeles Comic Book and Science Fiction Convention: a stage filled with the cast and creators of the CBS drama. The only problem? Not many fans showed up at all.

The Showtracker blog at The Los Angeles Times says that this might be because the show is neither sci-fi nor comic book-ish, but I don't know if that's a good enough excuse. It has a certain mystery/action element to it, and the first season was certainly enigmatic in a sci-fi sort of way. And plus we're talking about Los Angeles here, not a small town in Ohio, so I would think a lot more people would have showed up than did. Executive Producer Jon Turteltaub joked about the 80 fans in attendance making the ratings jump, but I don't know if that was a funny estimate by him or an accurate number.

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