Powered by i.TV
July 24, 2014

pbs

'America In Primetime': Watch PBS's Fantastic TV History Documentary

by Chris Harnick, posted Nov 28th 2011 5:00PM
America In PrimetimeIf you missed PBS's fascinating 'America In Primetime,' a four-part documentary series examining how various TV archetypes have progressed over the years, you're in luck: PBS has put the entire series online.

Featuring interviews with some of TV's best and brightest creators and actors, including Mary Tyler Moore, Carl Reiner, Julianna Margulies, Alan Ball and Candice Bergen, 'America In Primetime' is a must-watch.

The series is a treat for anybody, whether you're a casual viewer or a walking TV encyclopedia. Each episode will transport you back to the early days of TV, then dissect how much the TV landscape has changed. There's something for all to enjoy as the truly passionate TV veterans lay it all on the line.

Check out a segment from 'The Independent Woman' episode below.

Read More

PBS Confirms Season Premiere Dates for 'Downton Abbey' and 'Sherlock'

by Catherine Lawson, posted Nov 17th 2011 8:50AM
Restive 'Downton Abbey' fans need fret no more: PBS has confirmed that Season 2 will (finally!) premiere in the US on Sunday January 8, 2012. The AP reports Paula Kerger, PBS president, as saying that the abrupt ending to Season 1 and the paucity of episodes -- there were only four -- led to angry phone calls from fans, many of whom worried that PBS might not even air a second season.

PBS also has good news for 'Sherlock' fans. The 21st-century twist on Conan-Doyle's deerstalker-wearing detective will start its second season on PBS on Sunday May 6, 2012. Alas, it's only three episodes long, but fans can be assured that it should be a case of quality triumphing over quantity.

Other gems from the PBS spring lineup include a two-part examination of Bill Clinton's presidency, a look at some celebrity family trees by Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates, and a series on American infrastructure, 'America Revealed,' hosted by winner of 'Survivor: Cook Islands,' Yul Kwon. More on these after the jump.

Read More

PBS to Air No-Holds Barred Steve Jobs Documentary: 'One Last Thing'

by Catherine Lawson, posted Oct 27th 2011 6:15AM
PBS has announced that it will air a new, "unflinching" documentary about the late Appple co-founder Steve Jobs, who died three weeks ago. 'Steve Jobs -- One Last Thing' will air Wednesday, Nov. 2 as part of a night devoted to science and technology exploration.

In what's sure to stoke controversy in some quarters, PBS says 'One Last Thing' takes "an unflinching look at Jobs's difficult, controlling disposition, and offers unique insights into what made him tick. While there has been near-universal agreement that Steve Jobs was a great innovator in business and technology, ONE LAST THING looks into why he was so great. What were the influences that shaped his character? What drove him from such humble beginnings to the heights of success?"

The documentary features interviews with Apple insiders Steve Wozniak, Ronald Wayne and Dean Hovey, as well as Bill Fernandez, who introduced Jobs and Wozniak in Sunnyvale, where the three hung out in his father's garage and tinkered with electronics.

Read More

'Downton Abbey' Criticized for Using Historically Incorrect Language

by Catherine Lawson, posted Oct 21st 2011 8:50AM
Who knew that PBS period drama 'Downton Abbey' could be so controversial? Viewers in the U.K. are halfway through Season 2 right now and there has been criticism that the storylines are moving along too fast. Now some viewers have complained that the use of anachronistic language is marring their enjoyment of the series.

Hot on the heels of a recent debate over a character saying "as if" (the horror), John Simpson, of the 'Oxford English Dictionary,' told 'The MailOnline' that some other expressions used, such as "get knotted," "logic pills" and "shafted" were not in use until much later than 'Downton Abbey's World War I time-frame.

Read More

Jason Isaacs Talks About His Star Turn in the Engaging Detective Drama 'Case Histories'

by Maureen Ryan, posted Oct 13th 2011 1:00PM
You could watch the excellent 'Case Histories' (Sunday, PBS Masterpiece, check local listings) just to see Jason Isaacs play an Edinburgh detective very well, but this mystery import offers a host of other pleasures.

The thing is, Masterpiece's 'Case Histories,' which adapts a trio of Kate Atkinson's popular Jackson Brodie novels over the course of three weeks, can't be neatly filed away in the "mystery" category. As is the case with Atkinson's bestselling novels, this thoughtful and well-paced program ranges from the subversive to the sad without losing focus on the emotions of the complex people at the center of the story. Its frequently light tone can turn on a dime to tragedy, and the fact that this version of 'Case Histories' pulls off those transitions so deftly is a minor miracle.

"There is a bit of magical misdirection going on," actor Jason Isaacs, star of Showtime's 'Brotherhood' and NBC's upcoming drama 'Awake,' says of 'Case Histories,' in which he plays the ex-cop Jackson Brodie. "It looks like a crime thriller and it's not that at all. It's a great, big, current anthropological satire. It's full of these rich, boldly etched characters that leap off the page and screen, and they are not from the rag-bag of clichés that a crime thriller is normally made of."

Read More

'Upstairs Downstairs' Star Jean Marsh Suffers Stroke, Will Miss Filming

by Catherine Lawson, posted Oct 3rd 2011 8:00AM
Jean MarshMore drama offscreen at the rebooted PBS drama 'Upstairs Downstairs.' It's been announced that star and co-creator Jean Marsh will miss the first few episodes of Season 2 due to illness.

The BBC reports that Marsh has suffered a minor stroke and that scripts are being rewritten to accommodate her absence before filming starts next week.

Marsh, who plays maid Rose Buck, is the only cast member from the 1970s original series to appear in the rebooted version. She won Emmy nominations for her work in the role in 2011, 1974 and 1976, winning the award in 1975.

Read More

Ken Burns Previews His 'Prohibition' Documentary (VIDEO)

by Stephanie Opella, posted Sep 27th 2011 7:15PM

The phrase "single-issue campaigns, the decline of civil discourse and smear campaigns against presidential candidates" sounds like something you might hear on cable news these days, but that's how Ken Burns set the scene for his newest documentary 'Prohibition.'

Burns stopped by 'Good Day New York' (weekdays, 9AM ET on Fox) to preview the three-part documentary, which chronicles the rise and fall of the 18th Amendment.

The documentary filmmaker described American pre-prohibition drinking habits as an around-the-clock boozefest. "People had booze at breakfast ... the President of the United States John Adams would take a ladle-ful of hard cider," he said. In response, the Temperance Movement was born, which relied on the "insane idea that if you got rid of drink ... everything would be alright."

Read More

Alex Kingston Joins 'Upstairs Downstairs'

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 26th 2011 5:15AM
Alex KingstonThe runaway success of 'Downton Abbey' has led to big shakeups at rival PBS period drama, the rebooted 'Upstairs Downstairs.'

Following news that co-creator Eileen Atkins has quit the series, comes the announcement that 'ER' and 'Doctor Who' star Alex Kingston has signed on for a major role in the upcoming season.

The BBC announced that Kingston will play the younger sister of Atkins' character, Lady Holland, the racy-sounding archaeologist Blanche Mottershead.

"I simply couldn't resist the opportunity to get inside the iconic 165 Eaton Place," said Kingston, adding that Blanche is "a wonderfully, intriguing character ... who will over time reveal some secrets of her own."

Read More

PBS Triumphs at the Emmys With 'Downton Abbey'

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 19th 2011 7:00AM
'Gosford Park' Emmy winnersLast night PBS period drama 'Downton Abbey' bagged four Emmy Awards, making it one of the biggest winners of the night, and helping PBS land the coveted spot of top broadcast network at the awards.

Together with the Creative Arts Emmys, which were held last week, PBS scooped 14 Emmys in total, making it the most successful broadcast network. HBO was the top cable network, with 19.

'Downton Abbey' won the Emmy for Outstanding Made For Television Movie/Miniseries, in what creator Julian Fellowes called a David and Goliath story, "except in this case Goliath was wonderful, some wonderful shows that we were up against, and it seems perfectly extraordinary that we've won."

The Masterpiece drama was victorious in a strong field dominated by Emmy powerhouse HBO, which had three nominations -- 'Mildred Pierce,' 'Too Big to Fail' and 'Cinema Verité.'

Read More

Is Watching 'SpongeBob' Bad for Young Kids?

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 12th 2011 6:45AM
SpongeBob SquarePantsMost parents who allow their young children to watch TV spend a lot of time fretting over issues such as which shows are age-appropriate, which ones are educational or improving, and which ones could be harmful.

The latest kids' show to be called into question is Nickelodeon's long-running cartoon series, 'SpongeBob SquarePants.' According to The Wrap, a study due to be published online Monday by the journal 'Pediatrics' found that watching just nine minutes of 'SpongeBob' had a negative effect on four-year-olds' attention spans.

Nickelodeon questioned the validity of the findings, criticizing the small size of the control group and pointing to the fact that 'SpongeBob' is targeted at children aged six to eleven, not four.

Read More

Cast Announced for New PBS Masterpiece Drama, 'The Mystery of Edwin Drood'

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 5th 2011 1:00PM
Masterpiece logoIt's been announced that Masterpiece on PBS is set to mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens' birth by producing an ambitious two-part drama based on his final, unfinished novel.

Described as "a strange, disturbing and modern tale about drugs, stalking and darkness visible," 'The Mystery of Edwin Drood' is a is a psychological thriller about a provincial choirmaster's obsession with a young woman, and the lengths to which he'll go to attain her.

Matthew Rhys ('Brothers & Sisters') has signed on to play the troubled, opium-addicted choirmaster John Jasper, with Tamzin Merchant ('The Tudors') playing the object of his affections, 17-year old Roza Bud.

Read More

'Downton Abbey' Star Went on a Diet After Fans Called Him Fat on Twitter

by Catherine Lawson, posted Sep 5th 2011 8:30AM
Dan Stevens and Hugh BonnevilleMany actors say that they never read their press clippings for fear of seeing something negative or hurtful, but we just know that some of them go ahead and read them anyway.

Now one TV star has admitted that criticism from fans hit home, pushing him to go on a diet and lose 21 lbs.

Dan Stevens, who plays Matthew Crawley in PBS period drama 'Downton Abbey,' told 'The Daily Telegraph' that he hit the gym after he was mocked online.

"I think viewers will notice that I've lost [weight] since the first series," he said. "It's pretty much down to the fact that I had tons of comments on Twitter about how fat Matthew was looking."

Read More

'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood' Gets a Spin-Off Starring Daniel Tiger

by Chris Harnick, posted Aug 1st 2011 12:00PM
Daniel Tiger's NeighborhoodTen years after the last batch of new episodes of 'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood' aired, the popular children's series is getting a spin-off.

Announced at TCA, 'Daniel Tiger's Neighborhood' will be a multi-platform animated series aimed at pre-schoolers. The series follows the children of the original 'Mister Rogers' characters. The new 4-year-old Daniel Tiger is the son of the original 'Mister Rogers' Daniel Tiger. This is the first TV series The Fred Rogers Company has produced since 'Mister Rogers.'

"We're very excited to be creating a program that builds on Fred's legacy in such fresh and innovative ways," Bill Isler, president of the Fred Rogers Company, said in a statement. "Fred knew that school readiness skills are the foundation for academic achievement, and a full life, and now a growing body of research confirms this." Rogers died in 2003.

Read More

'Downton Abbey' Cast Talks Season 2: Love, War and More

by Maureen Ryan, posted Aug 1st 2011 11:30AM
Members of the media who attended Sunday's 'Downton Abbey' panel at the Television Critics Association press tour were treated to several minutes from the second season of the period drama, which takes place during World War 1.

The staples of the series were still there -- the gorgeous interiors and exteriors of the stately home gleamed, the starchy butler Carson disapproved of something being done by one of the aristocratic Crawley sisters, the snippy ladies' maid O'Brien looked down her nose at a cheeky new member of the below-stairs staff, and the relationship between Matthew Crawley, the man set to inherit Downton Abbey, and Lady Mary, an aristocrat with a scandal in her past, looked as complicated as ever.

But in interviews conducted before the panel, members of the 'Downton' cast said the war lent a new sense of urgency to the country house drama, which returns Jan. 8.

Read More

Ray Winstone to Star in 'Great Expectations' for PBS

by Catherine Lawson, posted May 31st 2011 7:55AM
Ray WinstoneIt's been announced that Ray Winstone ('Sexy Beast,' 'The Departed') has signed on to star in a new TV version of Charles Dickens' novel 'Great Expectations.'

The three-part miniseries is a BBC/PBS Masterpiece co-production, and filming's slated to start in London in July. Producers describe it as "Part thriller, part mystery, with a powerful love story at its heart and Dickens' trademark wit and characterisation throughout.

Winstone will play the pivotal character of Abel Magwitch: "'Great Expectations' is my favourite novel, and I'm thrilled to be playing Magwitch. I've wanted to play him for ages ... and I can't wait to get stuck in."

Read More

Follow Us

From Our Partners