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October 24, 2014

screen actors guild

SAG Award Nominees Announced

by Jean Bentley, posted Dec 16th 2010 10:25AM
'Mad Men'The Screen Actors Guild announced the nominees for its 17th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards today, and the list is filled with the usual suspects.

'Mad Men,' '30 Rock' and 'The Office' all got multiple noms, as did 'Modern Family,' 'Glee,' 'The Good Wife' and 'Dexter.' Surprisingly, Betty White and 'Hot in Cleveland' received nods, both of which the Hollywood Foreign Press overlooked in this year's Golden Globe nominations. Conspicuously absent: 'The Big Bang Theory.'

Check out all the nominees after the jump.

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What to Watch: Jan. 18-24

by Stephanie Earp, posted Jan 18th 2010 2:31AM


Dollhouse - Friday January 22, 8 pm, Global/Fox


EDITOR'S NOTE: The 'Dollhouse' finale has been postponed to January 29th. The Haiti fundraising telethon will air in its place.

While most TV viewers are excited about the new shows starting up, Joss Whedon fans are taking it on the chin again as 'Dollhouse' comes to a close. But there are some signs the show may live on, as 'Buffy' and 'Angel' did before it, in the world of comic books. At the very least, fans can tease themselves with trips to a couple of viral websites where Echo's world lives on. Check out the site for the Rossum Corporation, a rebel Ditch the Tech site, the issues-driven Not A Doll site and of course, get all the updates at Joss-central - Whedonesque.com.

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Screen Actors Guild award nominations for TV

by Allison Waldman, posted Dec 17th 2009 11:33AM
sag_statuetteEvery day it seems that we have nominations to announce. Yes, we are in award season and today it's the Screen Actors Guild's turn. On Saturday, January 23, 2010, at 8 p.m. on TNT and TBS, the winners of the 16th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards will air live from Los Angeles. Here's the nominees in the main categories and some thoughts on each:

Drama Ensemble: The Closer; Dexter; The Good Wife; Mad Men; True Blood

Interesting that CBS's The Good Wife made the cut, especially over Lost or House or Breaking Bad or Sons of Anarchy or Damages or Friday Night Lights. And I love The Closer, but the inclusion here is a surprise. I guess NCIS would be too big a surprise to get recognized.

Comedy Ensemble:
30 Rock; Curb Your Enthusiasm; Glee; Modern Family; The Office

Glee and Modern Family are freshmen, but clearly excellent ensemble comedies. And for Curb Your Enthusiasm, are they honoring the Seinfeld team all over again? Also, where's The Big Bang Theory?

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SAG ratifies new contract to avoid yet another Hollywood strike

by John Scott Lewinski, posted Jun 10th 2009 6:05PM
The Screen Actors Guild voted to avoid a strike Tuesday.The long Hollywood labor nightmare that began in November of last year officially ended yesterday when the Screen Actors Guild overwhelmingly ratified a new contract with the studios.

Guild members voted 78% in favor of the new agreement with the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers (AMPTP), despite calls by hard-line union members who urged actors to vote "no" and force continued negotiations.

It's clear that two huge factors in the SAG approval were general labor strife fatigue and the struggling economy.

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SAG, studios finally reach a deal

by Bob Sassone, posted Apr 17th 2009 10:13PM
Screen Actors GuildIt's been so long that we've heard anything about a possible actors strike that I kinda forgot all about it. Now it looks like we don't have to worry about it.

The Screen Actors Guild has made a tentative deal with producers and studios, so there will be no crazy interruption/chaos in our TV entertainment choices like we saw with the writers strike last year (remember that? Wasn't that fun?). The two major sticking points were compensation for new media (DVDs, online, etc) and when the contract would end. The two-year deal will be finalized this Sunday when the 71 member national board meets and votes on it. I'm sure a lot of members won't like the new contract but only half of the members have to vote for it to pass.

So if you've been worrying about a possible strike, you can exhale now. And get to work worrying about whether or not your favorite show will make it to the fall.

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Rosenberg loses to SAG, which is weird because he's the SAG president

by Danny Gallagher, posted Feb 16th 2009 10:02AM
Once again I'm forced to ask the question, what the hell is going on here? Have we entered the bizarro world? Is up now down? Has black become white? Did years of lending money for home loans and unpaid credit card debt give the U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman the magical power to turn the waning U.S. dollar into sweet, delicious candy?

The never-ending battle between SAG president Alan Rosenberg and his own organization has forced him to file an injunction against his own task force from starting their negotiations.

That means, in a weird, sordid, round-about way, Rosenberg is now fighting an uphill battle with himself. It's a wonder the actors didn't elect Britney Spears to run their union.

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SAG members filibuster and nothing gets done ... just like Congress

by Joel Keller, posted Jan 14th 2009 4:30PM
SAG logoThe big SAG strike news hitting the trades and the rest of the entertainment press today is ... that there isn't any news. A strike vote ballot still hasn't been sent to the members. But, boy, what's gone into the non-news is a hell of a lot of effort. Reports are that the decision to delay the ballot came after an epic 30-hour meeting, eight of which was spent on debating whether to end the meeting at 10 pm on Monday or 1 am on Tuesday. Fat lot of good that did; the meeting didn't break up until 6 am.

Apparently, there are two factions within the union; a larger Hollywood-based one that wants a strike, and a smaller New-York-and-elsewhere based one that doesn't want the walkout. The debates were more a result of the disagreement within the union than purposeful delay tactics; heck, they even tried to remove their lead negotiator.

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Is SAG about to kick themselves in the head?

by Danny Gallagher, posted Dec 31st 2008 12:00PM
If you were hoping the Screen Actors Guild would be able to rise above the fray and destroy the networks' heads with a mighty swipe of their superbly manicured hands, then keep hoping. Christmas is over and Santa has come and gone. Ask him next year.

The SAG's latest tactical move against the money grubbing networks is to oust their own negotiators.

If this were a military theater, we would be calling this a case of "friendly fire."

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The SAG strikes back

by Danny Gallagher, posted Dec 11th 2008 11:02AM
Remember the good old days when dock workers, air traffic controllers, teachers, and strike placard makers went on strike? Good, hard-working people who didn't make much money but put their bodies and well-being on the line every day to improve themselves and their community. In exchange, they received measly little things like health insurance, safe work conditions, and a vending machine in the break room that didn't eat quarters, dollars or fingers.

Those Norma Rae days are long gone. Now the only strikes we hear about are ones like the latest looming threat of a strike by the Screen Actors Guild, according to Reuters.

It's not that I don't feel sorry for SAG members or that I'm against their plight. Just about every industry in America has greedy CEOs who take as much as they can from as many as they can, all under the guise of performance and production bonuses earned by not running the company into Hell. It just feels like it could not have come at a worse time.

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What Rich is thankful for

by Richard Keller, posted Nov 24th 2008 8:02PM

Snoopy is thankful for not deflating. I'm thankful for television.It's that time of year again, isn't it? That brief period between the humongous holidays of Halloween and Christmas that television and retail outlets have forgotten about. I talk about Thanksgiving, of course. The holiday of football games, unbuttoned pants, family arguments, and giant Snoopy balloons. It is also the time to give thanks.

Thanks for what? Well, we aren't trading chickens for a gallon of gas yet, so that's something. And, we still have television, which we can eventually trade in for chickens in order to get a gallon of gas. But, since our television shows are more important than driving in many cases, we may just start riding our bikes and eat peanut butter sandwiches instead.

With those happy thoughts, here is what I am thankful for when it comes to the flat screen idiot box.

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SAG members are talking about a strike

by Allison Waldman, posted Nov 23rd 2008 11:03AM
SAGHow's this for happy holiday cheer? The Screen Actors Guild is gearing up to ask members to authorize a strike. Yes, that's right. The actors' union leadership -- headed up by Alan Rosenberg -- is talking tough and threatening another strike. It's been nearly a year since the Writer's Guild strike and the ramifications are still being felt throughout the TV business. An actors strike would be crippling.

Currently, SAG is working under a contract that expired on June 30. The WGA strike began on November 5, 2007 and was finally settled on February 12, 2008. Rosenberg and SAG knew how damaging the strike had been, and in the months before June 30, they tried for a settlement. They didn't get it done then, and they've been treading water ever since.

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More signs of the product placement apocalypse

by Brett Love, posted Aug 5th 2008 8:25AM

Psych - Jeff Fahey and Mercedes Mcnab
Ah, product placement. It's a subject that's come up before. We have an award for it, and even as far back as those care free days of 2005, Karina was writing about the Screen Actors Guild and Writers Guild Of America protesting it. The telling quote from that piece, "Our writers are being told to perform the function of ad copywriter, but to disguise this as storytelling." And isn't that where most of us have always drawn the line in the sand? The placing of products into sets was kind of an understood cost of doing business, but having the writers change scripts to incorporate them was a whole other ball of (Turtle) wax. Unfortunately, those (Foster Farms) chickens have come home to roost.

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No plans to strike, says SAG president

by Richard Keller, posted Jun 29th 2008 6:01PM

There is no strike authorization, according to the SAG presidentThere's good news and bad news coming from the on-going talks between the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP). The bad news is that there has been very little progress in talks between SAG and the studios concerning a new contract.

With their current contract expiring on June 30th, SAG members are looking for higher pay for "middle-tier" actors, those making less than $100,000 a year, and a greater cut of profits from DVD and new media sales -- a main sticking point during this past winter's Writers Guild strike. In addition to those woes, there are bitter splits taking place between SAG members and those of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) after the smaller union ratified an agreement with the studios.

The good news, at least for film and television viewers, is that SAG has no immediate plans to strike.

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Are you ready for another strike?

by Bob Sassone, posted Jun 19th 2008 2:21PM

SAGOh, if only the "reality-free" tag above meant something else when it comes to this.

Just when you thought you could sit back in your comfy chair and watch TV this fall, comes news that possible Screen Actor's Guild strike that has been talked about for weeks is very close to actually happening. The deadline is June 30, and while a lot of people in the industry thought that the contracts signed at the end of the writer's strike earlier this year (ah, remember those days?) could serve as a blueprint, that might not be the case.

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The Screen Actors Guild begins contract negotiations with the studios

by Richard Keller, posted Apr 16th 2008 6:02AM

The Screen Actors Guild begins negotiations. Here's to a speedy resolution.Here we go again. We have barely healed from the wounds that the Writers Guild of America strike opened up late last year, now it's the Screen Actors Guild's turn to make us nervous about the television we watch.

Yesterday, SAG representatives began negotiations with the Hollywood studios by swapping contract proposals between the two parties. This is the first time in nearly three decades that the Guild is negotiating solo with the studios since the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA) has rejected combined talks. AFTRA is upset with the Guild over concerns that it is attempting to poach its members. The Guild is denying this accusation with the statement that it normally broils its members over a low flame with some butter sauce.


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