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August 21, 2014

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'Treme' Some Tough TV to Watch

by Stephanie Earp, posted Apr 27th 2010 10:31AM


I am one of those people you meet at parties who tries to convince you to rent 'The Wire', and may even offer to loan you my DVD sets if you seem interested. I might not know your name, but give me your address and I'll drop them by, possibly with some handwritten notes about my favourite moments.

You've met people like me, I'm sure. And right now, people like me are trying to figure out if the new show from the creator of 'The Wire' is going to be as important to us. In case you missed the hype, it's called 'Treme' (pronounced 'Tray-may') and it's set in New Orleans about three months after Hurricane Katrina.

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TV 101: My Strange Hate For The Word-Of-Mouthers

by Jay Black, posted Apr 14th 2010 11:02AM
That's what all married men look like. Get it, because he's blue? Shut up.'Treme' premiered this week, but I was traveling and couldn't watch it. My plan had been to use HBO Go, but apparently "high speed internet" in Nacogdoches, TX really is just a system of tubes in the ground. The only site I could reliably connect to was a wholesale belt-buckle emporium.

Not seeing the show isn't a worry; 2010 might not have flying cars, but damned if we don't have a plethora of options for watching a show we missed. I'll eventually find it online, on demand, or on one of the approximately 419 identical HBOs that all have different names for some reason.

The only real worry I have is that if I wait too long to watch 'Treme', it'll be 'Friday Night Lights', 'The Wire' or 'Arrested Development' all over again. I'm scared that the word-of-mouthers will find out I'm not watching and they'll start annoying the living hell out of me.

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'The Wire' to Air on DirecTV

by Brad Trechak, posted Apr 13th 2010 10:32AM
The WireGood news for all you fans of 'The Wire.' You can direct your non-fan friends to the 101 Network on DirecTV starting on July 18th to have them view the high-definition, uncut and unedited episodes of the program. Of course, that means your friends will actually have to subscribe to DirecTV. Otherwise, you'll just have to get their hands on the DVDs.

Shows like 'The Wire' are best appreciated when they're unedited. Take 'The Sopranos' for example. It's difficult to watch that program in edited format on a basic cable channel. I recall a comedy sketch which parodied this concept in which the edited-for-television episodes of 'The Sopranos' were each three minutes long. While that's an exaggeration for comedic effect, it does emphasize a point. When a show with adult themes like 'The Wire' is edited for content, it loses something in the translation.

Fortunately, DirecTV subscribers have nothing to worry about. They get to enjoy it as it was intended to be.

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'Treme' Gets Up Close and Personal

by Chris Jancelewicz, posted Apr 9th 2010 1:36PM


When dealing with serious and potentially flammable subject matter, especially something as cataclysmic as 2005's Hurricane Katrina, a TV show has to tread carefully. 'Treme', a 10-episode HBO miniseries focusing on post-Katrina New Orleans, does not tread at all. Instead, it dives deep under the floodwaters and resurfaces with the corpses of those dead and gone -- lest we forget the immense tragedy that unfolded there.

Where most shows would exploit the exploitable (the riots, the pillaging, images of dying or dead people, the Dome), 'Treme' takes a raw look at the aftermath through a series of vignettes. The viewer follows different families and individuals as they try to put the pieces back together. Sometimes those pieces are tangible, like the rotting structure of a flood-damaged home, and sometimes they're purely emotional, like the trauma caused by a relative missing for months.

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'Treme' Reviews

by Allyssa Lee, posted Apr 8th 2010 8:00PM
Set three months after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, HBO's new series 'Treme' follows, quite simply, a loosely-connected network of New Orleans residents as they struggle to pick up their lives in the wake of the disaster.

But given that this is the latest effort from David Simon -- the much-heralded creator of the seminal HBO series 'The Wire' -- this drama proves to be so much more than just that.

Those expecting a Big Easy version of 'The Wire,' however, are out of luck. This is no police drama, and the city's politics are largely unexplored. The series takes its title from Faubourg Tremé, the historic New Orleans neighborhood adjacent to the French Quarter thought to be the birthplace of jazz. And the music from this multi-cultural, multi-storied, proud yet battered city pulses like a heartbeat throughout.

There's been no shortage of talent gracing this drama. The ensemble cast includes 'Wire' vets Wendell Pierce (a New Orleans native) and Clarke Peters, Khandi Alexander, Kim Dickens, Melissa Leo, John Goodman and Steve Zahn, in his first regular TV series role. Guest appearances from musicians such as Allen Toussaint, Elvis Costello, Dr. John and Kermit Ruffins lend authenticity.

Nor has there been a shortage of media coverage leading up to 'Treme's April 11 premiere. Sadly, part of that has been due to the unexpected death of one of the team's writers, David Mills. But 'Treme' is also being hailed as more than just another television program: It's an event. While some have noted the series' meandering pace, many critics have been praising Simon and co-creator Eric Overmyer's new series for its ability to immediately transport viewers on a musical journey into the heartbeat and the heartbreak of this weird and wonderful city.

Read what the critics had to say after the jump.

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John Goodman Back on TV with HBO's 'Treme'

by Nick Zaino, posted Apr 6th 2010 9:25AM
John Goodman in David Simon and Eric Overmyer's 'Treme' on HBOThere's already a lot of excitement over HBO's new series 'Treme,' and for good reason. The series, which debuts Sunday, is the brainchild of David Simon and Eric Overmyer, who gave us five wonderful seasons of 'The Wire' on HBO. And this series, which tells the story of post-Katrina New Orleans through the lens of a struggling musician and the community around him, looks full of potential with the same kind of quality we came to expect from 'The Wire' and Simon and Overmyer's 'Homicide' series.

Perhaps a smaller storyline is John Goodman's return to a regular TV series. Goodman has been in a couple of short-lived sitcoms ('Normal, Ohio' and 'Center of the Universe'), has appeared often on 'Saturday Night Live,' and done some voice-over work and cameos (he had a particularly good stretch on 'The West Wing'). So he has kept a somewhat steady television presence.

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'Treme' Writer David Mills Dies After Collapsing on Set

by Bob Sassone, posted Mar 31st 2010 10:55AM
Treme
Sad news coming out of the New Orleans set of the new HBO series 'Treme': writer and producer David Mills collapsed Tuesday on the set and later passed away at a local hospital. According to the Times-Picayune site, Mills had a brain aneurysm.

Mills was head writer and producer on the show, which is about how a group of people of New Orleans rebuild their lives after Hurricane Katrina. Mills won two Emmys for his writing and producing on the HBO miniseries 'The Corner' and wrote for several other shows as well, including 'ER,' 'Homicide: Life on the Street,' 'Kingpin,' 'NYPD Blue,' and was a story editor on the CBS drama 'Picket Fences.' He also wrote for several newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

'Treme' premieres on April 11.

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Behind-the-Scenes of HBO's 'Treme' (New Video!)

by Chris Harnick, posted Mar 29th 2010 2:20PM
TremeWith a strong cast of actors, award-winning veteran creators and a setting that has been a hotbed of controversy, heartache and celebration for years, HBO's 'Treme' (premiering Sun., April 11, 10PM ET) has been set up to be a hit for the cable network

Set three months after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the series will focus on how the neighborhood of Treme is rebuilding. The series comes from David Simon, creator of HBO's 'The Wire' and his collaborator on 'The Wire' and 'Homicide: Life on the Street,' Eric Overmyer.

'Treme' stars quite a few familiar faces such as Steve Zahn in his first series regular role, Khandi Alexander, John Goodman and Wendell Pierce.

Check out the video after the jump.

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Here's the Trailer for David Simon's 'Treme'

by Bob Sassone, posted Mar 17th 2010 1:36PM
All some TV viewers have to see in this trailer for the new HBO drama 'Treme' are the words "From the creators of 'The Wire'." But even if you didn't watch that show you might be impressed by this cast: Khandi Alexander, Steve Zahn, John Goodman, Clarke Peters, Rob Brown, Kim Dickens, Wendell Pierce. It's about New Orleans and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and premieres April 11.

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New 'Treme' Trailer Hits High Note

by Scott Harris, posted Mar 15th 2010 4:30PM
Ever since HBO's critically acclaimed masterpiece 'The Wire' went off the air two years ago, fans have been waiting to see what creators David Simon and Eric Overmyer would come up with next.

So when word came out that they were going to take on one of the most complicated issues in the country -- the effort to rebuild New Orleans in the aftermath of 2005's devastating Hurricane Katrina -- fans and pundits alike were both intrigued by the idea and dismayed at the wait for the project to actually materialize. Could the team from 'The Wire' find their magic again? And, if so, could even they do the subject matter justice?

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Even Movie Makers Love TV

by Stephanie Earp, posted Mar 9th 2010 11:23PM


I took a little break from this column last week because in my other life – the one not spent glued to the tube – I help run a 5-day film festival in the smallish Canadian city where I live. Running a film festival is not unlike running film – there are actors, directors and producers on hand, a general sense of panic, long hours, and really good after-parties, and with luck a critically-praised result.

This was my first year working on the film fest and I expected to be way out of my depth when it came to conversation. After all, I'm a small screen kind of girl. I even slipped up while introducing a panel of filmmakers, talking about how their films had "aired" the night before. Apparently, films screen, only TV shows air.

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Mischa Barton and Delaney Williams Guest on 'Law and Order: SVU' (VIDEO)

by Jane Boursaw, posted Mar 4th 2010 2:03AM
Law and Order: SVU, Mischa Barton, Delaney WilliamsMischa Barton showed up on 'Law and Order: SVU' (Wed., 9PM ET on NBC) as a prostitute trying to put away a hooker killer. And good for Barton. She's had her ups and downs, but hopefully she's getting her career back on track.

Equally as interesting is seeing Sgt. Landsman (Delaney Williams) from 'The Wire' playing defense attorney John Buchanan. Hope to see more of him on the screen, too.

Watch the video after the jump.

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TV's Rising Black Actors: Young, Gifted and African-American

by Sandie Angulo Chen, posted Feb 16th 2010 1:30PM
Amber RileyFebruary is Black History Month, and what better way to celebrate than to pay tribute to television's brightest young African-American actors.

Most of you are already fans of critically acclaimed vets like Chandra Wilson ('Grey's Anatomy'), Anthony Anderson ('Law & Order') and Regina King ('Southland'), but there is a new wave of up-and-coming black stars ready to make their mark. Here are 12 of our favorites. Who are yours?

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Right now on Cinematical

by Kona Gallagher, posted Jan 17th 2010 9:14AM
The folks at our sister site Cinematical are working hard to give you news and reviews of the best -- and worst -- the silver screen has to offer. Here are some of their musings on the latest blockbusters, indies, and everything in between:

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The Wire's David Simon takes on Post-Katrina New Orleans in Treme - TCA Report

by Joel Keller, posted Jan 15th 2010 1:29PM
David Simon, Wendell Pierce, and Eric Overmyer promoting Treme at the Winter 2010 TCAsIf there was anyone working in TV today who could create an accurate, in-depth portrait of post-Katrina New Orleans, it's David Simon. Many people call Simon's previous HBO series, The Wire, one of the greatest dramas of all time, and they do it for a reason: it has rich characterizations, well-examined stories, and it gives viewers a real feel for the underbelly of Baltimore.

So, with Treme, debuting on HBO in April, Simon tries to examine the lives of ten people who are trying to pull things together three months after Hurricane Katrina flooded out New Orleans.

"New Orleans, to me, represents a place where it's a triumph of American urban culture," said Simon. It's what - it's the best that an American city can be and also the worst in a lot of ways, as I said before, but it has created a culture that has gone around the world."

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